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Limit Theorems

  • A joke to introduce the idea of asymptotic distributions. The joke was written by Dennis Pearl of The Ohio State University.

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  • This 6 minute 39 second video can be used to teach the difference between correlation and causation. For example, that a relationship between X and Y might be explained by X causing Y, Y causing X, or a third factor that drives them both. The video is episode #109 (Nov 10, 2009) in the Psych Files podcast series produced and hosted by Michael A. Britt, Ph.D. at www.thepsychfiles.com. Video is free to use in the classroom or on course websites under a non-commercial ShareAlike creative commons license.

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  • This applet is designed to allow users to explore the relationship between histograms and the most typical summary statistics. The user can choose from several types of histograms (uniform, normal, symmetric, skewed, etc.), or can create their own by manipulating the bars of the histogram. The statistics available for display are mean, median, mode, range, standard deviation, and interquartile range. Also available is a "Practice Guessing" option, in which the values of the statistics are hidden until the user has entered guesses for each value.
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  • Oh, well, this would be one of those circumstances that people unfamiliar with the law of large numbers would call a coincidence. is a quote spoken by Sheldon Cooper (2007 - ) a character on the CBS comedy show "The Big Bang Theory" played by Jim Parsons (1973 - ). The quote occurred in Season 1 episode 4 that first aired in October, 2007.
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  • A cartoon to teach about outliers in scatterplots. The cartoon is #114 in the "Life in Research" series at www.vadio.com. Free to use with attribution in the classroom or on course websites.
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  • A cartoon to teach the idea that averages are less variable than individual values. The cartoon is free for use on course websites or in the classroom. Commercial uses must contact the copyright holder - British cartoonist John Landers (cartoons@landers.co.uk) who drew this cartoon based on an idea from Dennis Pearl.
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  • Many introductory Statistics courses consist of two main components: lecture sections and computer laboratory sections. In the computer labs, students often review fundamental course concepts, learn to analyze data using statistical software, and practice applying their knowledge to real world scenarios. Lab time could be better utilized if students arrived with 1) prior exposure to the core statistical ideas, and 2) a basic familiarity with the statistical software package. To achieve these objectives, PreLabs have been integrated into an introductory statistics course. A simple screen capture software (Jing) was used to create videos. The videos and a very short corresponding assignment together form a PreLab and are made available to students to access at appropriate times in the course. Some PreLabs were created to expose the students to statistical software details. Other PreLabs incorporate an available online learning resource or applet which allows students to gain a deeper understanding of a course concept through simulation and visualization. Not all on-line learning resources are ready to use 'as in' in a course. Some may be lacking a preface or description on how they are to be used; others may use slightly different notation or language than your students are accustomed to; a few may even contain an error or item that needs some clarification. One solution to such difficulties was to create a video wrapper so students can see how the applet works while receiving guidance from the instructor. In this webinar we will share the success story of how one introductory Statistics course integrated these video wrappers into the course and the discuss other possible applications.

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  • This joke can be used in a discussion of how sample size affects the reliability of the sample mean. The joke may be found amongst the extensive Science Jokes resources at www.newyorkscienceteacher.com
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  • A song about two-tailed tests for hypotheses about the mean that may be sung to the tune of the 1966 song "Break on Through (to the other side)" by the Doors. Lyrics by Dennis Pearl of The Ohio State University. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • The Normal Law is a poem whose words form the shape of the normal density. It was written by Australian-American chemist and statistician William John ("Jack") Youden (1900 - 1971). The poem was published in "The American Statistician" page 11 in v. 4 number 2 (1950).

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