Limit Theorems

  • A song that can be used in discussing the convergence of the sample proportion to the true probability as the number of independent trials grows larger. The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the 1967 song “Bare Necessities,” written by Terry Gilkyson for the animated Disney film The Jungle Book. Also, an accompanying video may be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBWKGEpQ2tk

    0
    No votes yet
  • A song that may be used in discussing the central limit theorem for the sampling distribution of means.  The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the classic Christmas song "Jingle Bell Rock" written by Joseph Beal and James Boothe in 1942.  Also, an accompanying video may be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mjy0AbJ5rJw

    0
    No votes yet
  • A quote that might be used in discussing the Law of Large Numbers. The quote is by English author and satirist Delarivier Manley (1663 – 1724) from her 1709 book "Secret Memoirs and Manners of Several Persons of Quality of Both Sexes."
    0
    No votes yet
  • A poem consisting of two quasi Haikus that can used in discussing the Cramer-Rao lower bound on the variance of a normally distributed statistic. The poem was written by Ming-Lun Ho of Chabot College and was given a third place award in the 2015 A-mu-sing contest.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A video to teach about the central limit theorem and various issues in one-sample hypothesis testing. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 1988 song "I'm Gonna Be (500 miles)" by the Scottish band The Proclaimers. The video took second place in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A poem for teaching about the Cramer-Rao lower bound on variance of estimators. The poem was written by Ming-Lun Ho, Chabot College. It won third place in the non-song category of the 2015 A-Mu-Sing competition.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke to introduce the idea of asymptotic distributions. The joke was written by Dennis Pearl of The Ohio State University.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This 6 minute 39 second video can be used to teach the difference between correlation and causation. For example, that a relationship between X and Y might be explained by X causing Y, Y causing X, or a third factor that drives them both. The video is episode #109 (Nov 10, 2009) in the Psych Files podcast series produced and hosted by Michael A. Britt, Ph.D. at www.thepsychfiles.com. Video is free to use in the classroom or on course websites under a non-commercial ShareAlike creative commons license.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This applet is designed to allow users to explore the relationship between histograms and the most typical summary statistics. The user can choose from several types of histograms (uniform, normal, symmetric, skewed, etc.), or can create their own by manipulating the bars of the histogram. The statistics available for display are mean, median, mode, range, standard deviation, and interquartile range. Also available is a "Practice Guessing" option, in which the values of the statistics are hidden until the user has entered guesses for each value.
    0
    No votes yet
  • Oh, well, this would be one of those circumstances that people unfamiliar with the law of large numbers would call a coincidence. is a quote spoken by Sheldon Cooper (2007 - ) a character on the CBS comedy show "The Big Bang Theory" played by Jim Parsons (1973 - ). The quote occurred in Season 1 episode 4 that first aired in October, 2007.
    0
    No votes yet

Pages