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Graphical Displays

  • A cartoon to teach about understanding large error bars (e.g. caused by the effect of outliers). The cartoon is #9 in the "Life in Research" series at www.vadio.com. Free to use with attribution in the classroom or on course websites.
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  • A song to aid in discussions about statistical models with non-normal errors. Sung by Canadian singer Gurdeep Stephens. Lyrics copyright and music performed by Michael Greenacre of Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Spain. May be sung to the tune of George and Ira Gershwin's 1935 standard "It Ain't Necessarily So"
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  • The two worksheets enable instructors to demonstrate how changes in the magnitude of the treatment effects and of the standard deviation of the error term will impact significance in a One-Way ANOVA model. The user specifies three input values that influence the simulation of random observations. ANOVA calculations are provided for the student, leaving the focus on the interpretation of the results. The mirror site (found at http://misnt.indstate.edu/cmclaren/ANOVA_Note.doc) contains an article that can serve as a teaching note to accompany the worksheets.
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  • A cartoon suitable for a course website that makes use of a boxplot to display an outlier and also uses the term "statistically significant" in its punch line. The cartoon is number 539 (February, 2009) from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

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  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about time series plots. The cartoon is number 252 (April, 2007) from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

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  • This NSF funded project provides worksheets and laboratories for introductory statistics. The overview page contains links to 9 worksheets that can be done without technology, which address the topics of obtaining data, summarizing data, probability, regression and correlation, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals. The page also contains twelve laboratories that require the use of technology. Data sets are provided in Minitab format.
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  • A song describing how sample means will follow the normal curve regardless of how skewed the population histogram is, provided n is very large.

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  • A cartoon to teach about using boxplots to summarize a distribution. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • A cartoon to teach about comparing parametric versus non-parametric inference. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from "Lower Bounds on Statistical Humor" by Alan H. Feiveson, Mark Eakin, and Richard Alldredge. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • Using cooperative learning methods, this lesson introduces distributions for univariate data, emphasizing how distributions help us visualize central tendencies and variability. Students collect real data on head circumference and hand span, then describe the distributions in terms of shape, center, and spread. The lesson moves from informal to more technically appropriate descriptions of distributions.
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