Data Presentation

  • A cartoon to be used in discussing density functions, scatterplots, and correlation. The plot is humorously labeled a density function – but is more readily interpreted as a scatterplot (in class discussions try to pin down how to interpret x and y). As a scatterplot, it shows a fairly clear (non-linear) association between x and y but would have a correlation of essentially zero. The cartoon is #1438 in the web comic Piled Higher and Deeper by Panamanian cartoonist Jorge Cham (1976- ): see www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1438. Free for use in classrooms and course websites with acknowledgement (i.e. "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham, www.phdcomics.com)
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  • A quote to help in discussing the importance of being able to interpret data and it's central role in a general education. The quote is found in Pearl S. Buck and Carlos P. Romulo, Friend to Friend (1958).
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  • A quote to be used in discussing the need for “Big Data” visualization and analytic techniques to handle the information overload seen in some areas. The quote is by American writer Rebecca Solnit (1961 - ) from a 2013 essay called "Diary," in London Review of Books.
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  • A quote to aid in discussing the foundational idea in statistics of the importance of understanding the nature of uncertainty. The quote is by Israeli-American educator, computer scientist, and co-founder of the Coursera online platform Daphne Koller (1968 - ). The quote is found in the May 3, 2008 New York Times story on Dr. Koller.
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  • This site did a lot of data visualization on many hot button topics. They provide the raw data that they used to create their graphs at this page. These data sets are kept in Google Doc spreadsheets.
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  • The Census Bureau has made many data visualizations of the data it collects. It is a good collections of maps, treemaps, an age/sex pyramid, and of course more familiar graphs, like bar graphs.
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  • Rseek.org is a search engine for R resources. Type any topic in the search box, and get resources that are R specific. You can further narrow your search to just articles, books, packages, support, or "for beginners."
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  • This online software allows you to load data and make professional-looking graphs with it. Graph types are basic (scatterplot, line plot, bar charts, etc.), statistical (histograms, box plots), scientific (error bars, heat map, contour), 3D charts, and financial (e.g. time series). Other graphs are available with the paid pro version. Log in is required, which allows you to upload data and save it for next use.
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  • This online application allows the user to import data from online resources such as Facebook, Google Analytics, GitHub, as well as spreadsheets on their own computers. They can then drag-and-drop variables to make graphs automatically. The basic version is free, but you can upgrade to a paid version which allows combining data across services and, if the data come from an online resource, the user has the choice to have Data Hub keep the graphs updated as the data changes.
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  • A song to aid in teaching about time series plots and the three principal things to look for in them: long term trends, seasonal or other cyclic patterns, and random fluctuations. The song may to sung to the tune of "You've Got a Friend" by Carole King from her 1971 Tapestry album (and later popularized by James Taylor). The lyrics to the parody were written in 2017 by Dennis K Pearl from Penn State University and Lawrence M Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso.
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