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Statistical Topic

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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the importance of efficiency in sampling. The cartoon was used in the April 2017 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. The winning caption was submitted by Mickey Dunlap from University of Georgia. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. Three honorable mentions that rose to the top of the judging in the April competition included "Better to ask for help BEFORE you're drowning in data!," written by Larry Lesser from University of Texas at El Paso; "I guess I should have asked for more details before signing up for this "Streaming Data" workshop," written by Chris Lacke from Rowan University; and "On reflection, random sampling WITH replacement might not have been appropriate in this scenario," written by Aaron Profitt from God's Bible School and College.

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  • A cartoon to aid in discussing Simpson's paradox by providing an illustration that an association seen in smaller groups can reverse direction when the data are aggregated. The cartoon was drawn by Britsh cartoonist John Landers based on idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University.

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  • A cartoon to be used as a vehicle to discuss Cornfield’s simple conditions required of a potential confounder to create a Simpson's Paradox situation The cartoon was used in the June 2018 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. This winning caption was submitted by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University.

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  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about publication bias and the small sample caution in hypothesis testing. The cartoon is number 2020 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

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  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about model fitting techniques. The cartoon is number 2048 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

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  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about Bayes Theorem (an obvious follow-up exercise is to ask what “P(C)” would have to be to make the “Modified Bayes Theorem” correct). The cartoon is number 2059 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

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  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about the idea of a falsifiable hypothesis. The cartoon is number 2078 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

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  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about cohort effects versus age effects in epidemiological studies. The cartoon is number 2080 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

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  • A joke to help in discussing Latin Square experimental designs. The joke was written by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso in November, 2018.

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  • A song to introduce the basic idea of using simulation to calculate a P-value for a randomization test (by simulating lots of group assignments and seeing what proportion of them give more extreme test statistics than observed with the actual group assignments).  The lyrics were written in November 2018 by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and Dennis Pearl from Penn State University. May be sung to the tune of the 1980 number #1 song “Celebration” by Kool and the Gang.

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