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  • An important idea in statistics is that the amount of data matters. We often teach this with formulas --- the standard error of the mean, the t-statistic, etc. --- in which the sample size appears in a denominator as √n. This is fine, so far as it goes, but it often fails to connect with a student's intuition. In this presentation, I'll describe a kinesthetic learning activity --- literally a random walk --- that helps drive home to students why more data is better and why the square-root arises naturally and can be understood by simple geometry. Students remember this activity and its lesson long after they have forgotten the formulas from their statistics class.
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  • Many of us, while teaching an introductory statistics course, have mentioned some of the history behind the methodology, perhaps just in passing. We might remark that an English chap by the name of R. A. Fisher is responsible for a great deal of the course content. We could further point out that the statistical techniques used in research today were developed within the last century, for the most part. At most, we might reveal the identity of the mysterious "Student" when introducing the t-test to our class. I propose that we do more of this. This webinar will highlight some opportunities to give brief history lessons while teaching an introductory statistics course.
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  • The true method of knowledge is experiment. This is a quote of British poet and artist William Blake (1857 - 1827). The quote is found in his 1788 book "All religions are one".
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  • This short article begins with a brief explanation of 3D barcodes (what they are and how they are used), and then provides an argument for why statistics should be studied and how statistics is a part of everyday life. Several links are shared for other resources related to teaching and learning statistics, in addition to a link to a career options in statistics.
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  • May 8, 2007 webinar resented by Bill Notz, The Ohio State University, and hosed by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. In this webinar Bill Notz, the Editor of the Journal of Statistics Education (JSE), discusses all aspects of the journal. He outlines the mission and history of the JSE, describes the various departments of the journal, explains what you can find at the journal's web site, indicates the types of manuscripts the journal seeks to publish, and mentions possible future directions.
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  • June 12, 2007 webinar presented by Rob Carver, Stonehill College, and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio Sate University. We've probably all observed that some of our students become positively irritated with the uncertainty that remains after solving a problem of statistical inference. This webinar reports on a continuing empirical investigation of the relationship between Ambiguity Tolerance (AT) and students' facility in developing the skills of inferential reasoning. This research uses some validated measures of AT and of statistical thinking to focus on ambiguity tolerance as an explanatory or moderating factor in learning to apply the techniques of inference.
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  • August 14, 2007 Teaching & Learning webinar presented by Oded Meyer, Carnegie Mellon University, and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. Carnegie Mellon University was funded to develop a "stand-alone" web-based introductory statistics course, and for several semesters they studied different ways in which the course could be used to support instruction. In this presentation, Dr. Meyer discusses some of the challenges in developing such a learning environment and ways in which the course tries to address them, as well as describing the design and results of accompanying studies.
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  • September 11, 2007 Teaching & Learning webinar presented by Ginger Rowell, Middle Tennessee State University, and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. The Internet is a great source of learning resources to help statistics teachers and students. Examples include interactive applets, videos, tutorials, lesson plans, case studies, and engaging learning activities. This webinar demonstrates how to assess statistics education learning materials based on the peer-review criteria used by digital libraries such as MERLOT and CAUSEweb.
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  • October 9, 2007 Teaching & Learning webinar presented by Norean Sharpe, Babson College, and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. Writing can be a wonderful tool to help illuminate what students are learning in our statistics courses. Examples and strategies to include writing in your teaching toolkit -- and to increase the writing skills of students -- include team assignments, weekly case reports, in-class questions, and others. This webinar shares effective approaches and assignments gleaned from twenty years of experience using writing in introductory and upper-level statistics courses.
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  • November 13, 2007 Teaching and Learning webinar presented by Michael Rodriguez and Andrew Zieffler, University of Minnesota, ad hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. This webinar includes an introduction to the idea of assessment for learning - assessments that support learning, enhance learning, and provides additional learning opportunities that support instruction. Several fundamental measurement tools are described to support the development of effective assessments that work.
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