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Statistical Topic

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  • May 8, 2007 webinar resented by Bill Notz, The Ohio State University, and hosed by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. In this webinar Bill Notz, the Editor of the Journal of Statistics Education (JSE), discusses all aspects of the journal. He outlines the mission and history of the JSE, describes the various departments of the journal, explains what you can find at the journal's web site, indicates the types of manuscripts the journal seeks to publish, and mentions possible future directions.

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  • June 12, 2007 webinar presented by Rob Carver, Stonehill College, and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio Sate University. We've probably all observed that some of our students become positively irritated with the uncertainty that remains after solving a problem of statistical inference. This webinar reports on a continuing empirical investigation of the relationship between Ambiguity Tolerance (AT) and students' facility in developing the skills of inferential reasoning. This research uses some validated measures of AT and of statistical thinking to focus on ambiguity tolerance as an explanatory or moderating factor in learning to apply the techniques of inference.

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  • September 11, 2007 Teaching & Learning webinar presented by Ginger Rowell, Middle Tennessee State University, and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. The Internet is a great source of learning resources to help statistics teachers and students. Examples include interactive applets, videos, tutorials, lesson plans, case studies, and engaging learning activities. This webinar demonstrates how to assess statistics education learning materials based on the peer-review criteria used by digital libraries such as MERLOT and CAUSEweb.

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  • A reference for analyzing large, complex data sets. Helpful for various levels of students.

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  • This site is a collection of information about references to mathematics (and probability/statistics) in fiction. Users can see an entire list (sorted by author, title or publication date)and can browse through the database to find references by genre, topic, motif or medium.

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  • In this module, students can test their knowledge of levels of measurement by attempting to determine the the level of measurement of ten different variables. For each variable, a statement is also provided and students can indicate whether the statement about the variable is valid or invalid (given the way in which the variable was measured). There is also a brief "refresher" included here about levels of measurement.

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  • This hour long radio podcast focuses on stochasticity, or randomness. According the website: "Stochasticity (a wonderfully slippery and smarty-pants word for randomness), may be at the very foundation of our lives. To understand how big a role it plays, we look at chance and patterns in sports, lottery tickets, and even the cells in our own body. Along the way, we talk to a woman suddenly consumed by a frenzied gambling addiction, meet two friends whose meeting seems to defy pure chance, and take a close look at some very noisy bacteria." Several guests appear in this radio podcast, including Deborah Nolan.

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  • This simulation allows you to roll two dice and compare empirical and probability histograms for the sum or product of the two outcomes.

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  • This is an extensive collection (and a continuously expanding collection) of applets on topics that include probability, descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, Monte Carlo simulation, Buffon's coin problem, chi-square, p-values, correlation, and more. There is even a random number generator that is part of the collection.

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  • This applet displays various distributions and allows the user to experiment with the parameters to see the effects on the curve.

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