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  • March 24, 2009 Activity webinar presented by Nicholas Horton, Smith College, and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Otterbein College. Students have a hard time making the connection between variance and risk. To convey the connection, Foster and Stine (Being Warren Buffett: A Classroom Simulation of Risk and Wealth when Investing in the Stock Market; The American Statistician, 2006, 60:53-60) developed a classroom simulation. In the simulation, groups of students roll three colored dice that determine the success of three "investments". The simulated investments behave quite differently. The value of one remains almost constant, another drifts slowly upward, and the third climbs to extremes or plummets. As the simulation proceeds, some groups have great success with this last investment--they become the "Warren Buffetts" of the class. For most groups, however, this last investment leads to ruin because of variance in its returns. The marked difference in outcomes shows students how hard it is to separate luck from skill. The simulation also demonstrates how portfolios, weighted combinations of investments, reduce the variance. In the simulation, a mixture of two poor investments is surprisingly good. In this webinar, the activity is demonstrated along with a discussion of goals, context, background materials, class handouts, and references (extra materials available for download free of charge)

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  • A joke that can be used when teaching six sigma process control ideas or chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests. The joke was written in 2013.

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  • This is a chapter on data wrangling excerpted from a book on data science. The book is “Modern Data Science with R,” and the authors are Benjamin J. Baumer, Daniel T. Kaplan, and Nicholas J. Horton. It contains the R code needed to do basic things with data such as sorting, arranging, and summarizing data.

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  • This is a chapter on ethics excerpted from a book on data science. The book is “Modern Data Science with R,” and the authors are Benjamin J. Baumer, Daniel T. Kaplan, and Nicholas J. Horton. The chapter presents several ethical dilemmas, then a framework to use when evaluating ethical issues. Then it discusses the dilemmas again, now resolving them.

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  • This site is a lesson on using SQL. It starts with a simple SELECT query. The user must type in the correct command to select certain columns from a database. Once the user has completed the first lesson, then he or she may continue to more complicated lessons.

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  • This tutorial on SQL teaches the most used commands. There is a short explanation, then the user is asked a simple question. If the typed answer is correct, the user continues to the next lesson.
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  • Notes on hypothesis testing and how to interpret the p-value with respect to the significance level of a hypothesis test.
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  • This online application allows the user to import data from online resources such as Facebook, Google Analytics, GitHub, as well as spreadsheets on their own computers. They can then drag-and-drop variables to make graphs automatically. The basic version is free, but you can upgrade to a paid version which allows combining data across services and, if the data come from an online resource, the user has the choice to have Data Hub keep the graphs updated as the data changes.
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  • This online booklet comes out of the Mosaic project. It is a guide aimed at students in an introductory statistics class. After a chapter on getting started, the chapters are grouped around what kind of variable is being analyzed. One quantitative variable; one categorical variable; two quantitative variables; two categorical variables; quantitative response, categorical predictor; categorical response, quantitative predictor; and survival time outcomes.
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  • This site shows the code you would use to replicate the examples in Applied Survival Analysis, by Hosmer and Lemeshow. It has code in Stata, R, and SAS.
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