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  • As mentioned on the home page of this resource "This site presents workbook-style, project-based material that emphasizes real world applications and conceptual understanding. This material is designed to give students a sense of the importance and allure of statistics early in their college career. By incorporating many of the successful reforms of the introductory statistics course into a wide range of more advanced topics we hope that students in any discipline can realize the intellectual content and broad applicability of statistics."

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  • Learn to distinguish between exponential and logistic growth of populations, identify carrying capacity, differentiate density-dependent and density-independent limiting factors, apply population models to data sets and determine carrying capacity from population data. Make predictions on graphs and interpret graphical data to analyze factors that influence population growth.

    This link includes a lesson plan, assessment materials, and access to SmartGraphs, a software that helps students create and interpret graphs.

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  • This is a site that contains a number of types of material that can be used in teaching about chance and probability. Lesson plans, syllabi, suggested activities, and data sets are available. The data sets contain interesting information for students such as: quarterback passing rating data, baseball streaks, and baseball salaries that can be used to illustrate means, medians, etc.. The site also contains a link to the Chance News (which is now a wiki on CAUSEweb).

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  • Share with your students why the presence of an outlier affects which measure of central tendency to report. Feel free to modify this Powerpoint presentation to fit the needs of your students. Included at the end are additional online resources to further engage your students in their learning about the mean, median, and mode. The presentation is covered by a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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  • This applet builds confidence intervals for the percentage of orange candies in box with two colors of candies. A smaller box visualizes the sample, and a graph keeps track of the location of the confidence interval. Students can take one sample (producing one CI) repeatedly, or take 100 random samples at once. The population percentage is hidden from view unless the student asks to see it, in which case it is displayed on the graph of confidence intervals. This allows the students to see whether each interval "hits" or "misses". Several parameters can be varied: sample size, confidence level and number of samples. A set of questions alongside the applet guides students.

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  • OStats is a simple tool for data visualisation and statistical analysis, particularly aimed at helping students learn statistics.

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  • This site is a collection of interesting stories in the news that relate to statistics, major league baseball standings, links to textbooks, and links to applets. It also contains some reflections on statistical issues from retired professor John Marden (from University of Illiois at Urbana-Champaign).

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  • This site is a collection of resources related to experiments. The site includes references, resources, and articles related to the scientific method, experimental research, ethics in research, and research design. It also includes tips on writing scientific papers, and there are several statistics tutorials on the site. Another interesting feature of the site is a collection of case studies that include descriptions of famous research studies in fields like social psychology, sociology, physics, biology, and medicine.

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  • This hour long radio podcast focuses on stochasticity, or randomness. According the website: "Stochasticity (a wonderfully slippery and smarty-pants word for randomness), may be at the very foundation of our lives. To understand how big a role it plays, we look at chance and patterns in sports, lottery tickets, and even the cells in our own body. Along the way, we talk to a woman suddenly consumed by a frenzied gambling addiction, meet two friends whose meeting seems to defy pure chance, and take a close look at some very noisy bacteria." Several guests appear in this radio podcast, including Deborah Nolan.

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  • This YouTube channel includes a series of video interviews between John McGready and some of his colleagues from Johns Hopkins University. The videos are meant to highlight the importance of biostatistics as a core driver of public health discovery, the importance of statistical reasoning in the research process, and how the fundamentals that are covered in an introductory biostatistics course are the framework for more advanced methodology.

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