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Statistical Topic

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  • A webpage in which links are provided to histograms of sample statistics (mean, median, standard deviation, maximum etc.) as a function of sample size. Each time the REFRESH button is clicked a new set of 2000 samples is generated.
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  • Luck is the residue of design is a quote by American baseball executive Branch Rickey. The quote appeared in the February 21, 1946 issue of the "Sporting News". The quote is also often attributed to 17th century English poet John Milton - but that source has not been confirmed.
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  • This java applet can be used to determine whether or not the means in two sample populations are significantly different.
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  • This applet performs the Student's t test on two sets of data, and reports the average and variance for both sets of data, the t score, degrees of freedom, and one and two tailed P values.
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  • Probability plotter and calculator allows students to explore different distributions and their relationships. Interactive dialogue box allows students to change distribution shape and scaling parameters as well as allowing to explore cumulative probabilities. Discrete distributions include the discrete uniform, binomial, and the poisson. Continuous distributions include the uniform, beta, exponential, weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions. Sampling distributions include the normal, the t-distribution, the chi-square, and the F-distribution.
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  • Descriptions, examples, and online calculators for a variety of statistical concepts. Includes One-Way Anova, Tukey's Post Hoc Test, and much, much more.
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  • As mentioned on the home page of this resource "This site presents workbook-style, project-based material that emphasizes real world applications and conceptual understanding. This material is designed to give students a sense of the importance and allure of statistics early in their college career. By incorporating many of the successful reforms of the introductory statistics course into a wide range of more advanced topics we hope that students in any discipline can realize the intellectual content and broad applicability of statistics."
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  • I'd Like to Teach the World to Think is a parody of the 1971 hit single "I'd Like to Teach the World to Sing (in perfect harmony)" by the New Seekers. The music for the song was also made famous in a series of Coca-Cola advertisements that have run for decades. The parody may be used in teaching the value of collecting data, especially to improve reliability and the need to assume the null hypothesis is true in carrying out a significance test. Lyrics by Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University) with assistance from Lawrence Mark Lesser (University of Texas at El Paso). Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • In this video (which lasts almost 20 minutes), statistics guru Hans Rosling debunks myths about the so-called "developing world."
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  • August 25, 2009 Activity webinar presented by Michelle Everson, University of Minnesota and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. In a classroom setting, students can engage in hands-on activities in order to better understand certain concepts and ideas. Replicating hands-on activities in an online environment, however, can be a challenge for instructors. The purpose of this webinar is to present an applet that was created to replicate a "Post-it Note" activity commonly used in classroom sections of an undergraduate introductory statistics course at University of Minnesota. The Post-it Note activity is meant to help students develop a more conceptual understanding of the mean and the median by moving a set of Post-it Notes along a number line. During the webinar, participants have an opportunity to see and experience just how online students are able to interact with an applet named the "Sticky Centers" applet, and the webinar presents the kinds of materials and assignments that have been created to use in conjunction with this applet. The webinar ends with a preview of a newer applet that is being developed in order to replicate the famous "Gummy Bears in Space" activity (presented in Schaeffer, Gnanadesikan, Watkins & Witmer, 1996). A supplemental student handout is available for download free of charge.
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