Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Resource Library

Statistical Topic

Advanced Search | Displaying 1 - 10 of 284
  • Explore the Hubble Deep Fields from a statistical point of view.  Watch out for the booby traps of bias, the vagueness of variability, and the shiftiness of sample size as we travel on a photo safari through the Hubble Deep Fields (HDFs).

    0
    No votes yet
  • This program focuses on the teamwork required to produce a successful mission and the importance of statistics in project design and management. Using the video and a hands-on lesson, students learn about statistical analysis and how people use statistics, such as mean, median, mode and range, to make decisions. Members of the Penske Racing Team and engineers from Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne help students investigate the relationship between work, energy and power as they look at race car design, the space shuttle and the International Space Station.

    0
    No votes yet
  • In this free online video program, "students will understand inference for simple linear regression, emphasizing slope, and prediction. This unit presents the two most important kinds of inference: inference about the slope of the population line and prediction of the response for a given x. Although the formulas are more complicated, the ideas are similar to t procedures for the mean sigma of a population."

    0
    No votes yet
  • In this free online video program, "students will discover how to convert the standard normal and use the standard deviation; how to use a table of areas to compute relative frequencies; how to find any percentile; and how a computer creates a normal quartile plot to determine whether a distribution is normal. Vehicle emissions standards and medical studies of cholesterol provide real-life examples."

    0
    No votes yet
  • November 23, 2010 Activity Webinar presented by Stacey Hancock, Reed College, Jennifer Noll, Portland State University, Sean Simpson, Westchester Community College, and Aaron Weinberg, Ithaca College, and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. Extra materials available for download free of charge. Many instructors ask students to demonstrate the frequentist notion of probability using a simulation early in an intro stats course. Typically, the simulation involves dice or coins, which give equal (and known) probabilities. How about a simulation involving an unknown probability? This webinar discusses an experiment involving rolling (unbalanced) pigs. Since the probabilities are not equal, this experiment also allows the instructor to have students think about the concept of fairness within games.

    0
    No votes yet
  • November 14, 2006 webinar presented by Chrstine Franklin, University of Georgia, and Jessica Utts, University of California and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. In 2005 the American Statistical Association endorsed the recommendations of a report written by leading statistics educators, called "Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education" (GAISE). The report had two parts - one for K-12 and one for the college introductory statistics course. In this webinar, two members of the report-writing team review the recommendations in the report, and provide suggestions for how to begin to implement them.

    0
    No votes yet
  • October 10, 2006 webinar presented By John Holcomb, Cleveland State University, and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. This webinar presents a quick overview of assessment methods related to student writing assignments and data analysis projects. Beginning with short writing assignments, Dr. Holcomb progresses through a range of different approaches to projects at the introductory course level. On-line resources containing existing project ideas will be shown along with ideas for creating one's own projects. The webinar also discusses several approaches to evaluating the range of assignments.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Webinar presented September 12, 2006 by Brian Jersky, St. Mary's College, and Robert Gould, UCLA, and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. This webinar discusses resources available to educators to assist them in crafting lesson plans that meet the GAISE. The presenters briefly explain the GAISE, which were endorsed by the American Statistical Association and also the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and demonstrate various resources offered through CAUSEweb and other channels.

    0
    No votes yet
  • February 13, 2007 webinar presented by Jim Albert, Bowling Green State University, and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. An introductory statistics course is described that is entirely taught from a baseball perspective. This class has been taught as a special section of the basic introductory course offered at Bowling Green State University . Topics in data analysis are communicated using current and historical baseball datasets. Probability is introduced by describing and playing tabletop baseball games. Inference is taught by distinguishing between a player's "ability" and his "performance", and then describing how one can learn about a player's ability based on his season performance. Baseball issues such as the proper interpretation of situational and "streaky" data are used to illustrate statistical inference.

    0
    No votes yet
  • January 9, 2007 webinar presented by Sterling Hilton, Brigham Young University, and hosted by Jackie Miler, The Ohio State University. Beginning in January 2005, the ASA (with support from the National Science Foundation) started a series of three workshops for statisticians and mathematics education researchers. The purpose of these workshops was to make recommendations on ways to promote high-quality education research that can stand up under the scrutiny of other scientific communities and that will allow work to be compared and combined across research programs. A draft version of the final report from these workshops entitled "Using Statistics Effectively in Mathematics Education Research" has been written. This webinar summarizes the major points of this report and discuss their relevance to researchers in statistics education.

    0
    No votes yet

Pages

list