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  • Negative Correlation is a poem by Maarten Manhoff (1972 - ); the pen name for Ernst Wit of Lancaster University in the United Kingdom. The poem was written in 2003.
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  • Empty Cells in Contingency Tables is a poem that can be used to teach the difference between random zeros and structural zeros in contingency tables. The poem was written by Maarten Manhoff (1972 - ), the pen name for Ernst Wit of Lancaster University in the United Kingdom
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  • Outliers is a triangular shaped poem written in 2008 by Jacqueline Shaffer (1980 - ) of California State University, East Bay. The poem focuses on the issue that outliers should not be removed from a data set without a reason.
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  • Probability is a 2 minute 14 second video that can be used in discussing the probability of rare events (e.g. how many consecutive times must a coin land heads before you question whether it is a fair coin?). The video was written, shot, and edited by Sam Rapien in 2007. The music is by Brett Musil and Sam Rapien and the single cast member is Jon Anderson. Mr. Rapien made this video while a graduate student in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln.
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  • Experiment is the sole source of truth. It alone can teach us something new: it alone can give us certainty. A quote from French mathematician and physicist Jules Henri Poincare (1854 - 1912) found in "The Foundations of Science", page 127, The Science Press, 1913. The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.
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  • The Normal Law is a poem whose words form the shape of the normal density. It was written by Australian-American chemist and statistician William John ("Jack") Youden (1900 - 1971). The poem was published in "The American Statistician" page 11 in v. 4 number 2 (1950).
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  • Approximately half the articles published in medical journals that use statistical methods use them incorrectly. A quote by American Cardiologist and anti-smoking crusader Stanton A. Glantz. The quote appeared as the first line of the abstract in the paper "Biostatistics: How to Detect, Correct and Prevent Errors in the Medical Literature" that appeared in "Circulation" page 1 of volume 61, number 1 (1980). The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.
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  • A professor's enthusiasm for teaching introductory courses varies inversely with the likelihood of his having to do it. is a quote from the 1973 book "Malice in Blunderland" by American engineering professor Thomas Lyle Martin Jr.(1921-2009). The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.
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  • It is better to be satisfied with probabilities than to demand impossibilities and starve. A quote attributed to German philosopher, poet, and dramatist Friedrich Schiller (1759 - 1805). The quote may also be found in "The New Book of Unusual Quotations" by Rudolf Flesch (Harper & Row, 1966)
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  • A joke about the economic value of a degree in the applied mathematical sciences compared to a more theoretical degree.
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