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Statistical Topic

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  • Explore the Hubble Deep Fields from a statistical point of view.  Watch out for the booby traps of bias, the vagueness of variability, and the shiftiness of sample size as we travel on a photo safari through the Hubble Deep Fields (HDFs).

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  • This page will compute the One-Way ANOVA for up to five samples. The design can be either for independent samples or correlated samples (repeated measures or randomized blocks). This page will also perform pair-wise comparisons of sample means via the Tukey HSD test

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  • This page will perform a two-way factorial analysis of variance for designs in which there are 2-4 levels of each of two variables, A and B, with each subject measured under each of the AxB combinations.

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  • This applet generates a graph of the sampling distribution of sample means and displays the probabilities associated with that distribution. Users enter the mean and standard deviation of the source population and the size of the samples. The applet also calculates the standard error of the sample means.

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  • This page will perform an analysis of variance for the situation where there are three independent variables, A, B, and C, each with two levels. The user may enter data directly or copy and paste from a spreadsheet or other application.

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  • A joke that can be used when teaching six sigma process control ideas or chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests. The joke was written in 2013.

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  • A song for teaching concepts of estimating a population mean and addressing uncertainty in the estimate. The lyrics were written by Lawrence Mark Lesser from University of Texas at El Paso as a parody of the 2011 song "Call Me Maybe" written by Carly Rae Jepsen, Tavish Crowe, and Josh Ramsay). The lyrics were awarded second prize in the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit educational use. Musical accompaniment realization are by Joshua Lintz and vocals are by Mariana Sandoval from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • This activity focuses on basic ideas of linear regression. It covers creating scatterplots from data, describing the association between two variables, and correlation as a measure of linear association. After this activity students will have the knowledge to create output that yields R-square, the slope and intercept, as well as their interpretations. This activity also covers some of the basics about residual analysis and the fit of the linear regression model in certain settings. The corresponding data set for this activity, 'BAC data', can be found at the following web address: http://www.causeweb.org/repository/ACT/BAC.txt

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  • If you can't measure it, I'm not interested. A quote by Canadian educator and management theorist Laurence Johnston Peter (1919 - 1990) from "Peter's People" in "Human Behavior" (August, 1976; page 9). The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.

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  • This joke can be used to motivate class discussions on the assumptions underlying drawing conclusions from data (especially the assumption of stationarity). The joke is a revision of a story in "The Angel's Dictionary: A modern tribute to Ambrose Bierce" by Edmund Volkart - also quoted in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of Quotations" by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither (page 62). The revision (to make the story suitable for classroom use) was written by Dennis Pearl, The Ohio State University.

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