Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Resource Library

Advanced Search | Displaying 31 - 40 of 562
  • A joke that can be used when teaching six sigma process control ideas or chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests. The joke was written in 2013.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Although numbers don't lie, it's rather annoying that they don't tell us everything we need to know. Maybe it's because 99% of all statistics only tell us 49% of the story. is a quote by American investment author Ron DeLegge II (1971 - ). The quote appears in his book "Gents With No Cents" published in 2011 by Half Full Publishing Group.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A song for teaching about the Cramer Rao Lower Bound for the variance of an unbiased estimate. The lyrics were written by Kyle White and Bradley Turnbull from North Carolina State University as a parody of the 2003 track "Jerk It Out" by the Swedish band "Caesars". The song won first prize in the song category in the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition and is performed by "The Fifth Moment", an NCSU graduate student band (Kristin Linn, Jason Osborne, Siddharth Roy, Bradley Turnbull, Joseph Usset, and Kyle White). Free for use in non-profit education settings.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A song for teaching concepts of estimating a population mean and addressing uncertainty in the estimate. The lyrics were written by Lawrence Mark Lesser from University of Texas at El Paso as a parody of the 2011 song "Call Me Maybe" written by Carly Rae Jepsen, Tavish Crowe, and Josh Ramsay). The lyrics were awarded second prize in the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit educational use. Musical accompaniment realization are by Joshua Lintz and vocals are by Mariana Sandoval from University of Texas at El Paso.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A song providing an overview of Introductory Statistics with lyrics written by Michael Posner of Villanova University who also performs the song on the accompanying MP3 audio file. The song is a parody of the 2010 hit "Cooler Than Me" by Mike Posner. The song is also the sound track on the corresponding video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rKQtDb4VjU The video and song were the grand prize winner of the CAUSE 2013 A-Mu-sing competition. Free for use in nonprofit education applications.

    5
    Average: 5 (1 vote)
  • This activity focuses on basic ideas of linear regression. It covers creating scatterplots from data, describing the association between two variables, and correlation as a measure of linear association. After this activity students will have the knowledge to create output that yields R-square, the slope and intercept, as well as their interpretations. This activity also covers some of the basics about residual analysis and the fit of the linear regression model in certain settings. The corresponding data set for this activity, 'BAC data', can be found at the following web address: http://www.causeweb.org/repository/ACT/BAC.txt

    0
    No votes yet
  • This activity explains the important features of a distribution: shape, center, spread, and unusual features. It also covers how to determine the difference between mean and median, and their respective measures of spread, as well as when to apply them to a particular distribution. Graphical displays such as: histograms and boxplots are also introduced in this activity. The corresponding data set for this activity is found at the following web address: http://www.causeweb.org/repository/ACT/food.txt

    0
    No votes yet
  • Song addresses the value of a scientific poll. May be sung to the tune of the Rolling Stones' hit "It's Only Rock 'N Roll (But I Like It)" by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. Musical accompaniment realizationare by Joshua Lintz and vocals are by Mariana Sandoval from University of Texas at El Paso.

    0
    No votes yet
  • That was why statistics had to be invented - because people were so unstable and irrational, taken one at a time. A quote of American science fiction author Raymond F. Jones (1915 - 1994) found in his 1956 short story "The Non-Statistical Man". The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon to teach about ambiguous reporting of survey information. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.

    0
    No votes yet

Pages