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  • A quote to discuss the role of the teacher in fostering learning. The quote is by evangelical educator Henrietta Mears (1890 – 1963) as quoted in Donna Kafer, Women of Courage (2007). The quote may also be found at www.quotationsbywomen.com
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  • A quote for use in a statistics education course to initiate conversations about the key elements that foster student learning. The quote is by American Statistics Education Researcher Joan Garfield (1951 - ) from the University of Minnesota. The quote appears in her article "How Students Learn Statistics" in the International Statistical Review (1995; p. 25-34).
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  • A quote that can be used in discussing the value and wide applicability of simulation for understanding statistical concepts and applying statistical methods. The quote is by American Statistical educator Christine Franklin (1956 - ) and is found in a 2013 interview with her conducted by Allan Rossman in the Journal of Statistics Education (volume 21, number 3).
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  • This online booklet, “Start Teaching with R,” by Randall Pruim, Nicholas J. Horton, and Daniel T. Kaplan comes out of the Mosaic project. It describes how to get started teaching Statistics using R, and gives teaching tips for many ideas in the course, using R commands.
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  • This is a web application framework for R, in which you can write and publish web apps without knowing HTML, Java, etc. You create two .R files: one that controls the user interface, and one that controls what the app does. The site contains examples of Shiny apps, a tutorial on how to get started, and information on how to have your apps hosted, if you don't have a server.
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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the F test in ANOVA and for discussing general student anxiety about statistics. The cartoon was used in the December 2016 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. The winning caption was submitted by Larry Lesser at The University of Texas at El Paso, while the drawing was created by John Landers using an idea from Dennis Pearl. A second winning caption "Mark was pleased to note that he was a significant outlier. Little did he know it was a two-sided test..." written by Robert Garrett, a student at Miami University is well-suited to stimulate a discussion of statistical hypothesis testing and the effect of outliers (see "Cartoon: The Exam I")
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  • "Solving Problems" is a poem by Scottish poet Eveline Pye from Glasgow Caledonin University. The poem was originally published in the September 2011 issue of the bimonthly magazine Significance, in an article about Eveline Pye's statistical poetry. "Solving Problems" might be used in course discussions of the importance of practice with real world data in developing statistical thinking, reasoning, and problem solving skills.
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  • "America is shamefully inadequate at teaching statistics. A student can travel from kindergarten to a Ph.D. without ever encountering the subject. Yet statistics are ubiquitous in life, and so should be statistical reasoning." A quote by American economist Alan S. Blinder (1945 - ) that can be used for discussing the importance of statistics and statistical reasoning. The quote appeared in the New York Times Sunday Book Review on December 27, 2103 where Dr. Blinder was commenting on the importance of "The Signal and the Noise," a popular book by statistician Nate Silver.
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  • "Shorn of all subtlety and led naked out of the protective fold of educational research literature, there comes a sheepish little fact: lectures don’t work nearly as well as many of us would like to think." A quote by George Cobb from his 1992 paper "Teaching Statistics," in Heeding the Call for Change: Suggestions for Curricular Action, ed. Lynn Steen, MAA Notes Number 22, 3-43. The quote is a well-phrased reminder that listening to lectures is not an effective way for students to learn.
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