Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Multimedia

  • This video is an example of what is known in psychology as selective attention. When a person is instructed to only focus on the number of times a ball is passed between players wearing a white shirt it is sometimes difficult to see what else is going on.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This lesson plan uses the Birthday Paradox to introduce basic concepts of probability. Students run a Monte Carlo simulation using the TI-83 graphing calculator to generate random dates, and then search for matching pairs. Students also perform a graphical analysis of the birthday-problem function. Key Words: Permutations; Explicit Function; Recursive Function; Modeling.
    0
    No votes yet
  • As taken from the web site: "STATGRAPHICS Centurion is designed for anyone who wishes to do serious data analysis without investing weeks learning how to use a statistical package. It contains over 150 statistical procedures, covering everything from summary statistics to design of experiments. Yet you don't need to be a statistician to use the program. Everything is completely menu-driven, and there are tools such as the StatWizard and StatAdvisor to help you use the program most effectively." This program is available in three editions:Standard, Professional, and Enterprise.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This text document is a detailed index of the Against All Odds video series. This detailed index allows instructors to quickly find stories that can be used in the classroom. The author also includes the his ratings of which video segments are useful in the classroom. The actual videos are viewable online and are also indexed in CAUSEweb.
    0
    No votes yet
  • An applet explores the following problem: A long day hiking through the Grand Canyon has discombobulated this tourist. Unsure of which way he is randomly stumbling, 1/3 of his steps are towards the edge of the cliff, while 2/3 of his steps are towards safety. From where he stands, one step forward will send him tumbling down. What is the probability that he can escape unharmed?

    0
    No votes yet
  • In this demonstration a scatterplot is displayed and you draw in a regression line by hand. You can then compare your line to the best least squares fit. You can also try to guess the value of Pearson's correlation coefficient.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This applet shows how the correlation between two variables is affected by the range of the variable plotted on the X-axis.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This applet demonstrates that even a "small" effect can be important under some circumstances. Applicants from two groups apply for a job. The user manipulates the mean and the cut-off score in order to see the effects the small changes has on the number of people hired in each group. The effects on the proportion of hired applicants from each group are displayed.(Requires a browser that supports Java).
    0
    No votes yet
  • The applet allows users to sample from a normal distribution or from a uniform distribution. It shows the expected values and the observed values and computes the deviation. Then, a chi-square test shows if the deviations are significant for both the normal and uniform distributions.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This applet demonstrates how the reliability of X and Y affect various aspects of the regression of Y on X.
    0
    No votes yet

Pages