Fun

  • Legal proceedings are like statistics. If you manipulate them, you can prove anything. A quote by Bristish-born Canadian novelist Arthur Hailey (1920 - 2004). The quote is found in the novel "Airpot" (1968; Doubleday, p. 385). The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.
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  • Song about the use of the logarithmic transformation in statistics. May be sung to the tune of "Hound Dog" which was popularized by Elvis Presley. Lyrics written by Dennis Pearl with assistance from Deb Rumsey. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • Song about the use of the Mann-Whitney U statistic (also known as the two sample Wilcoxon statistic). May be sung to t he tune of "I Will Find You" by Peter Hammill; Fie Records, 1991.
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  • A song parody about how teachers lament that their students do not learn to think. Yet the exams they give only test memorization of rote facts. May be sung to the tune of Pete Seeger's "Where Have All the Flowers Gone." Lyrics written by Dennis Pearl with lots of help from Lawrence Mark Lesser (University of Texas, El Paso). Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • This tutorial explains the theory and use of Pearson's Product Moment Coefficient of Correlation and demonstrates it with an example on GPA and test scores. Data is given as well as SPSS and Minitab code.
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  • This tutorial explains the theory and use of One-Way ANOVA and demonstrates it with an example on final exam scores. Data is given as well as SPSS and Minitab code.
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  • This tutorial explains the theory and use of the Chi-Square Test for goodness of fit and demonstrates it with an example on mastery test scores. Data is given as well as SPSS and Minitab code.
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  • This collection of datasets addresses social science issues and is housed at the University of Wisconsin. Free registration is required to access the datasets.
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  • Song includes vocabulary from fitting models, including outliers and assumptions. May be sung to tune of "You've Got Your Models" (The Fortunes). Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • Song playfully celebrates Bayesian inference and includes various vocabulary such as coherence, prior, and exchangeable. May be sung to the tune of "Strangers in the Night" (Kaenpfert/Singleton/Snyder). Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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