Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Curriculum

  • Statistics and probability concepts are included in K–12 curriculum standards—particularly the Common Core State Standards—and on state and national exams. STEW provides free peer-reviewed teaching materials in a standard format for K–12 math and science teachers who teach statistics concepts in their classrooms.

    STEW lesson plans identify both the statistical concepts being developed and the age range appropriate for their use. The statistical concepts follow the recommendations of the Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) Report: A Pre-K-12 Curriculum Framework, Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, and NCTM Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. The lessons are organized around the statistical problemsolving process in the GAISE guidelines: formulate a statistical question, design and implement a plan to collect data, analyze the data by measures and graphs, and interpret the data in the context of the original question. Teachers can navigate the STEW lessons by grade level and statistical topic.

    0
    No votes yet
  • In the "Mathematics & Statistics" section on the "Faculty Showcase" tab, one can find a free, online statistics textbook (and link to other text resources) along with multiple professors' accounts of how they use this text in their respective classrooms.  On each professor's page is a description of the course taught, what caused each instructor to switch texts, how the text/course material has been received by students, and a sample assignment/syllabus from the course.  This is a wealth of information for those looking to switch books or gain insight into other professors' classes.

    0
    No votes yet
  • CODAP provides an easy-to-use web-based data analysis platform, geared toward middle and high school students, and aimed at teachers and curriculum developers. CODAP can be incorporated across the curriculum to help students summarize, visualize and interpret data, advancing their skills to use data as evidence to support a claim.

    5
    Average: 5 (1 vote)
  • A resource providing information about what the sample size is, what factors the sample size depends on, and how it can be determined,
    5
    Average: 5 (1 vote)
  • Resource providing information about: computation of the sample size and the assumptions that must be made to do so. Several examples are given with different conditions in each, and a table showing minimum sample sizes for a two-sided test.
    0
    No votes yet
  • Article that explains why comparing statistical significance, sample size and expected effects are important before constructing and experiment.
    0
    No votes yet
  • If you plan to use inferential statistics (e.g., t-tests, ANOVA, etc.) to analyze your evaluation results, you should first conduct a power analysis to determine what size sample you will need. This page describes what power is as well as what you will need to calculate it.
    0
    No votes yet
  • Determining the right sample size in a reliability test is very important. If the sample size is too small, not much information can be obtained from the test in order to draw meaningful conclusions; on the other hand, if it is too large, the information obtained through the tests will be beyond that needed, thus time and money are wasted. This tutorial explains several commonly used approaches for sample size determination.
    0
    No votes yet
  • The process of sample size calculations, including relevant definitions, is explained and clear examples for different study designs are provided for illustration. A range of software packages and websites are discussed and evaluated
    0
    No votes yet
  • Chapter from a textbook that covers the topic of sample size by giving a thorough background and then covering issues that are involved when determining the sample size.
    0
    No votes yet

Pages