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  • Theory is a good thing, but a good experiment is forever. is a quote by Russian nobel prize winning physicist Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa (1894 - 1984). The quote is found on page 160 of "Experiment, theory, practice, articles and addresses volume 46."
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  • ...experiment without mathematics will neither sufficiently discipline the mind or sufficiently extend our knowledge... is a quote by Scottish geophysicist Balfour Stewart (1828 - 1887). The quote is found in a letter from Stewart to Henry Roscoe of Owens College on June 2, 1870.
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  • The only relevant test of the validity of a hypothesis is comparison of prediction with experience. is a quote of American economist and statistician Milton Friedman (1912 - 2006). The quote can be found in the chapter "The methodology of positive economics" written by Dr. Friedman as an original article in his 1953 book "Essays in Positive Economics" containing a collection of his earlier articles.
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  • This site contains a small collection of videos about how to use Minitab.
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  • This site contains several videos about how to use Mathematica and how to teach with Mathematica.
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  • This site includes several short tutorials that showcase different features of JMP 7. There is also another site with JMP tutorials at http://stat.fsu.edu/tutorials/
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  • September 28, 2010 Activity webinar presented by Carolyn Cuff, Westminster College and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. Extra materials available for download free of charge. Students must confront their misconceptions before we can teach them new concepts. Naively, a census is an accurate method to quantify a population parameter. A very brief, memorable and easy to implement activity demonstrates that a census is at best difficult even for a small and easily enumerated population.
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  • August 24, 2010 Activity Webinar presented by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. Extra materials available for download free of charge. When Dr. Miller took a graduate course in College Teaching, she learned the jigsaw method. The jigsaw is a cooperative learning technique where students work together in a "home" group on a specific task and then are placed into "jigsaw" groups made up of one member from each home group. For example, if there are 25 students in the class, 5 students would be assigned to each of the A, B, C, D, E home groups, and each jigsaw group would each one member from A, B, C, D, and E. While in the jigsaw groups, the students teach each other what they learned in their home groups. Dr. Miller recalls bringing the idea back with her to one of the OSU elementary statistics courses where it has been used successfully since 1996. Recently a graduate teaching assistant (GTA) suggested to other GTAs that this might be good in another introductory statistics course, and the activity has been adopted successfully . As structured, the jigsaw can be used in an exam review in statistics by assigning students to, say, 5 exercises that they need to master before they go to their jigsaw groups to teach others about their exercise. During this webinar, the webinar presents how the jigsaw is done and address questions like: How do you budget your time for this class activity? How do you know that students are teaching the correct answer? How do you know that students are not just furiously writing down answers instead of listening to understand the concept? Can this work for you? By the end of the webinar, hopefully you will be as intrigued as Dr. Miller was to learn about the jigsaw method and will want to try it in your classroom.
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  • July 27, 2010 Activity Webinar presented by Herle McGowan, North Carolina State University and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. Extra materials available for download free of charge. In this webinar, the webinar discusses the end-of-semester project that is used in North Carolina State's introductory statistics course. This project supports statistical thinking by allowing students to apply knowledge accumulated throughout the semester. Students are presented with a research question and must design and carry out an experiment, analyze the resulting data and form a conclusion over the course of several class periods.
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  • A sketch by Anastasia Mandel reinterpreting Government Bureau by George Tooker (1956) with the statistical caption "Queuing theory and implementation." This is part of a collection of sketches by Anastasia Mandel and their accompanying statistical captions discussed in the paper "How art helps to understand statistics" (Model Assisted Statistics and Applications, 2009) by Stan Lipovetsky and Igor Mandel in volume 4 pages 313-324. Free to use in classrooms and on course websites.
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