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  • There is no free hunch. is quote by American psychologist and political scientist Robert P. Abelson (1928 - 2005). The quote is found on page 142 of his 1995 book "Statistics as a Principled Argument". It is referred to as "Abelson's Sixth Law" in a discussion of the generalizability of estimated effects.
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  • A cartoon for use in discussing outliers. The cartoon is by New Zealand cartoonist Nick Kim (see www.lab-initio.com). This copyrighted cartoon is available for free use in classes and on course webistes at non-profit educational institutions. Commercial inquiries should be directed to the artist (e-mail:nick@lab-initio.com).
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  • A cartoon to use in discussing the importance of indicating the variability associated with any prediction. The cartoon is the work of Theresa McCracken and appears as #5756 on McHumor.com (appearing here with a statistics-based caption change suggested by Dennis Pearl). Free for non-profit use in statistics course such as in lectures and course websites.
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  • Lest men suspect your tale untrue, Keep probability in view. is a quote by English poet and playwright John Gay (1685 - 1732). The quote is the first two lines of the poem "The Painter who pleased Nobody and Everybody," which is fable number 18 from the from the 1727 collection "Fables" volume 1.
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  • There is no such thing as luck; there is only adequate or inadequate preparation to cope with a statistical universe. is a quote by American Science fiction writer Robert Anson Heinlein (1907-1988). The quote appears at the begiining of section 2 of his 1958 serialized novel "Have Space Suit - Will Travel".
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  • Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) is a program, for networked computers, that enables frequent writing assignments without any increase in instructor work. In fact, CPR can reduce the time an instructor now spends reading and assessing student writing. CPR offers instructors the choice of creating their own writing assignments or using the rapidly expanding assignment library. If you believe in constructivist learning, writing is the most important tool that you have. But if you have a class of 300 students, grading essays challenges even the true believer. Calibrated Peer Review (CPR)can be used in classes of any size. CPR is based on the model of peer review in science. The student reads a document, either on-line or hard copy, then writes about it. When the student has demonstrated competence as a reviewer, the program delivers three peer documents on for review. The student answers content and style questions and assigns scores. Finally, the student does a self-review. The student grade comes from writing and reviewing. Even though the program is only in its third year, approximately 100,000 students have used it. Although CPR was designed for use in large chemistry classes, experience has shown that it can serve in many other disciplines, as well. Currently, business, chemistry, economics, English, and life science instructors are using CPR in college, graduate and professional, high schools and middle schools. CPR was developed in the Chemistry Department at U.C.L.A. with funding provided by the National Science Foundation and Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

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  • This is a lesson plan for 16 to 17 year old students that focuses on developing students' understanding of the relative strengths and weaknesses of various representations of real world univariate statistics. Students work in groups to research different visual representations and create a wiki page of their findings.

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  • This blog will be about access: access to data and access to analysis tools. This blog will be about data privacy, and data sharing. This blog will be about people who use data to better their lives and the lives of others. This blog is meant for anyone wishing to become a citizen statistician, but in particular for statistics teachers-those who help empower citizens to become citizen statisticians.

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  • Although numbers don't lie, it's rather annoying that they don't tell us everything we need to know. Maybe it's because 99% of all statistics only tell us 49% of the story. is a quote by American investment author Ron DeLegge II (1971 - ). The quote appears in his book "Gents With No Cents" published in 2011 by Half Full Publishing Group.
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  • If you think that statistics has nothing to say about what you do or how you could do it better, then you are either wrong or in need of a more interesting job. is a quote by Swiss Statistician Professor Stephen John Senn (1953 - ). The quote is from his 2003 book "Dicing with Death: Chance, Risk, and Health" published by Cambridge University Press.
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