Undergraduate students

  • This is a complete lesson module (including example problems with answers to selected problems) for the purpose of enabling students to: 1) Provide examples demonstrating how the margin of error, effect size, and variability of the outcome affect sample size computations. 2) Compute the sample size required to estimate population parameters with precision. 3) Interpret statistical power in tests of hypothesis. 4) Compute the sample size required to ensure high power when hypothesis testing.
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  • When performing a hypothesis test about the population mean, a possible reason for the failure of rejection of the null hypothesis is that there's an insufficient sample size to achieve a powerful test. Using a small data set, Minitab is used to check for normality of the data, to perform a 1-Sample t test, and to compute Power and Sample Size for 1-Sample t.
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  • Document (pdf) illustrating a test of normality using an Anderson-Darling test in MINITAB and a test of equality of variances with an F-test in EXCEL.
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  • This site did a lot of data visualization on many hot button topics. They provide the raw data that they used to create their graphs at this page. These data sets are kept in Google Doc spreadsheets.
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  • The Census Bureau has made many data visualizations of the data it collects. It is a good collections of maps, treemaps, an age/sex pyramid, and of course more familiar graphs, like bar graphs.
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  • This online software allows you to load data and make professional-looking graphs with it. Graph types are basic (scatterplot, line plot, bar charts, etc.), statistical (histograms, box plots), scientific (error bars, heat map, contour), 3D charts, and financial (e.g. time series). Other graphs are available with the paid pro version. Log in is required, which allows you to upload data and save it for next use.
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  • This software makes it easier to use the R language. It includes a code debugger, editing, and visualization tools.
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  • These slides from the 2014 ICOTS workshop describe a minimal set of R commands for Introductory Statistics. Also, it describes the best way to teach them to students. There are 61 slides that start with plotting, move through modeling, and finish with randomization.
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  • This online booklet comes out of the Mosaic project. It is a guide aimed at students in an introductory statistics class. After a chapter on getting started, the chapters are grouped around what kind of variable is being analyzed. One quantitative variable; one categorical variable; two quantitative variables; two categorical variables; quantitative response, categorical predictor; categorical response, quantitative predictor; and survival time outcomes.
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  • This site is an interactive, online tutorial for R. It asks the user to type in commands at an R prompt, which are then evaluated. Typing the right thing allows the user to continue on, typing the wrong thing yields an error. The user cannot skip the easier lessons. Lessons are: Using R; Vectors; Matrices; Summary Statistics; Factors; Data Frames; Real-World Data; and What’s Next.
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