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High School

  • This software makes it easier to use the R language. It includes a code debugger, editing, and visualization tools.

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  • This is a youtube video by Jeremy Balka that was published in May 2013. The video presents a discussion of the assumptions when using the t distribution in constructing a confidence interval for the population mean. By considering various population distributions, the effect of different violations of the normality assumption is investigated through simulation.
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  • What is correct, what is incorrect, and why?
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  • This case study starts by the simple comparison of the prices of houses with and without fireplaces and extends the analysis to examine other characteristics of the houses with fireplace that may affect the price as well. The intent is to show the danger of using simple group comparisons to answer a question that involves many variables. The lesson shows the R code for doing this analysis; however, the data and the model could be used with another statistical software.

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  • This complete lesson plan, which includes assessments, is based upon a data set partially discussed in the article "Female Hurricanes are Deadlier than Male Hurricanes." The data set contains archival data on actual fatalities caused by hurricanes in the United States between 1950 and 2012. Students analyze and explore this hurricane data in order to formulate a question, design and implement a plan to collect data, analyze the data by measures and graphs, and interpret the results in the context of the original question.
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  • The STatistics Education Web, also called STEW, is an online collection of peer-reviewed statistics lesson plans for K-12 teachers. The web site is maintained by the ASA and accessible to K-12 teachers throughout the world. Lessons cover a wide range of probability and statistics topics.
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  • The textbook website for "Statistics: The Art & Science of Learning from Data," by Agresti, Franklin and Klingenberg, has a collection of Shiney Apps for visualizing statistical concepts. There are usable on computers, tablets and smart phones. Apps include Exploratory Analysis, Random Numbers, Association and Linear Regression, Distributions, Probabilities, Sampling distributions, Central Limit Theorem,, Inferential Methods (one and two samples), ANOVA, and Bootstrap Confidence Intervals & Permutation Tests.
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  • The textbook, "Statistics: Unlocking the Power of Data," by Lock, Lock, Lock, Lock, and Lock, webpage has a collection of data sets which are used in their textbook. Even without the textbook, the variables are well named, and it is relatively easy to tell what the variables represent.
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  • This webpage provides an active learning lesson for linear regression. Resources include an in-class student activity sheet for two different levels of classes (Algebra I and Junior), a PowerPoint showing faces of famous people, and sheet with updated (to the end of current year) actual ages of the celebrities.
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  • A joke to be used in discussing the assumption of normality in using the t-distribution for inference. The Joke was written in 2016 by Judah Lesser an AP statistics student from El Paso, Texas.
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