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College --Undergrad Upper Division

  • Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There's no better rule. is a quote by English novelist Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870). The quote appears in chapter 40 of his popular novel "Great Expectations" written as a weekly serial from December 1860 to August 1861. The line was spoken in the novel by Mr. Jaggers to Pip.
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  • Whatever the progress of human knowledge, there will always be room for ignorance, hence for chance and probability. is a quote by French mathematician Emile Borel (1871 - 1956). The quote may be found on page 12 of his 1914 book "Le hasard"
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  • The world of science lives fairly comfortably with paradox. We know that light is a wave and also that light is a particle. The discoveries made in the infinitely small world of particle physics indicate randomness and chance, and I do not find it any more difficult to live with the paradox of a universe of randomness and chance and a universe of pattern and purpose than I do with light as a wave and light as a particle. Living with contradiction is nothing new to the human being is a quote by American young adult fiction author Madeline L'Engle (1918-2007). The quote is on page 125 of her 1988 book "Two-Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage".
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  • Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct, not tried it. is a quote from American computer scientist Donald E. Knuth (1938 - ). The quote was written on March 22, 1977 as the last sentence of a five-page memo entitled "Notes on the van Emde Boas construction of priority deques: An instructive use of recursion."
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  • Although we often hear that data speak for themselves, their voices can be soft and sly. is a quote by American statistician Charles Frederick Mosteller (1916 - 2006). The quote is found on page 234 of his 1983 book "Beginning Statistics with Data Analysis".
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  • I am not surely always in the wrong; 'Tis hard if all is false that I advance, A fool must now and then be right by chance. is a quote from English poet William Cowper (1731 - 1800. The quote comes from three lines in his 1782 poem "Conversation."
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  • The true logic of this world is the calculus of probabilities. This is a quote of Scottish physicist and mathematician James Clerk Maxwell (1831 - 1879). The quote is found on page 197 in volume 1 of "The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell, (James Clerk Maxwell and Peter Michael Harman, ed.)".
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  • January 26, 2010 webinar presented by Alicia Gram, Smith College, and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. This webinar describes an activity that uses data collected from an experiment looking at the relationship between two categorical variables: whether a cotton plant was exposed to spider mites; and did the plant contract Wilt disease? The activity uses randomization to explore whether there is a difference between the occurrence of the disease with and without the mites. The webinar includes a discussion of the learning goals of the activity, followed by an implementation of the activity then suggestions for assessment. The implementation first uses a physical simulation, then a simulation using technology. (Extra materials, including Fathom instructions for the simulation, available for download free of charge).

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  • In this 20 minute video, doctor and researcher Hans Rosling uses his fascinating data-bubble software to burst myths about the developing world. The video includes new analysis on China and the post-bailout world, mixed with classic data shows.

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  • A sketch by Anastasia Mandel reinterpreting "Sunset, Eagle Cliff, New Hampshire" by Jasper Francis Cropsey (1867) with the statistical caption "Regression tree, still standing after the trials." This is part of a collection of sketches by Anastasia Mandel and their accompanying statistical captions written by Stan Lipovetsky and Igor Mandel that took first place in the cartoon & art category of the 2009 A-Mu-sing contest sponsored by CAUSE. The collection and their accompanying statistical captions discussed in the paper "How art helps to understand statistics" (Model Assisted Statistics and Applications, 2009) by Stan Lipovetsky and Igor Mandel in volume 4 pages 313-324. Free to use in classrooms and on course websites.
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