College --Undergrad Upper Division

  • This is an e-book tutorial for R. It is organized according to the topics usually taught in an Introductory Statistics course. Topics include: Qualitative Data; Quantitative Data; Numerical Measures; Probability Distributions; Interval Estimation; Hypothesis Testing; Type II Error; Inference about Two Populations; Goodness of Fit; Analysis of Variance; Non-parametric methods; Linear Regression; and Logistic Regression.
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  • The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource is a collection of data sets. It includes definitions of each variable in the data set. It requires a login to retrieve the data sets. Registering involves giving your name and address and the name of the study and a detailed description of the intended use of the data.
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  • This complete lesson plan, which includes assessments, is based upon a data set partially discussed in the article "Female Hurricanes are Deadlier than Male Hurricanes." The data set contains archival data on actual fatalities caused by hurricanes in the United States between 1950 and 2012. Students analyze and explore this hurricane data in order to formulate a question, design and implement a plan to collect data, analyze the data by measures and graphs, and interpret the results in the context of the original question.
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  • A reference for analyzing large, complex data sets. Helpful for various levels of students.
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  • A cartoon for use in celebrations of Random Acts of Kindness Day which is an unofficial holiday in many countries typically celebrated in Febraury. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on the suggested illustrating text and concept from Larry Lesser (The University of Texas at El Paso). The cartoon was first displayed on the website http://www.worldofstatistics.org on Random Acts of Kindness day in February 2014. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites or other non-profit teaching uses.
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  • A poem for teaching about the Cramer-Rao lower bound on variance of estimators. The poem was written by Ming-Lun Ho, Chabot College. It won third place in the non-song category of the 2015 A-Mu-Sing competition.
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  • The quiet statisticians have changed our world - not by discovering new facts or technical developments but by changing the ways we reason, experiment and form our opinions about it. is a quote by Canadian science philosopher Ian Hacking (1936-). The quote is found on page 70 of his 1984 "Science" article "Trial by number" (volume 84 p. 67-70)
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  • Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There's no better rule. is a quote by English novelist Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870). The quote appears in chapter 40 of his popular novel "Great Expectations" written as a weekly serial from December 1860 to August 1861. The line was spoken in the novel by Mr. Jaggers to Pip.
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  • Whatever the progress of human knowledge, there will always be room for ignorance, hence for chance and probability. is a quote by French mathematician Emile Borel (1871 - 1956). The quote may be found on page 12 of his 1914 book "Le hasard"
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  • The world of science lives fairly comfortably with paradox. We know that light is a wave and also that light is a particle. The discoveries made in the infinitely small world of particle physics indicate randomness and chance, and I do not find it any more difficult to live with the paradox of a universe of randomness and chance and a universe of pattern and purpose than I do with light as a wave and light as a particle. Living with contradiction is nothing new to the human being is a quote by American young adult fiction author Madeline L'Engle (1918-2007). The quote is on page 125 of her 1988 book "Two-Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage".
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