Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

College --Undergrad Lower Division

  • A video to teach about the central limit theorem and various issues in one-sample hypothesis testing. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 1988 song "I'm Gonna Be (500 miles)" by the Scottish band The Proclaimers. The video took second place in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A video to teach about principles of Analysis of Variance. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 1984 song "Hallelujah" by Canadian songwriter Leonard Cohen. The video took third place in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A video to dispel myths about Statistics and excite students early in a course. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 2000 song "Where Are You, Christmas? " written by James Horner and Will Jennings for the movie "How the Grinch Stole Christmas". The video received an honorable mention in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A song providing an overview of Introductory Statistics with lyrics written by Michael Posner of Villanova University who also performs the song on the accompanying MP3 audio file. The song is a parody of the 2010 hit "Cooler Than Me" by Mike Posner. The song is also the sound track on the corresponding video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rKQtDb4VjU The video and song were the grand prize winner of the CAUSE 2013 A-Mu-sing competition. Free for use in nonprofit education applications.

    5
    Average: 5 (1 vote)
  • A song for teaching concepts of estimating a population mean and addressing uncertainty in the estimate. The lyrics were written by Lawrence Mark Lesser from University of Texas at El Paso as a parody of the 2011 song "Call Me Maybe" written by Carly Rae Jepsen, Tavish Crowe, and Josh Ramsay). The lyrics were awarded second prize in the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit educational use. Musical accompaniment realization are by Joshua Lintz and vocals are by Mariana Sandoval from University of Texas at El Paso.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This simulation illustrates least squares regression and how the least squares solution minimizes the sum of the squared residuals. The applet demonstrates, in a visual manner, various concepts related to least squares regression. These include residuals, sum of squares, the mean line, how the line of best fit is determined, and how the line of least squares solution minimizes the sum of the squared residuals.

    0
    No votes yet
  • The WISE Bootstrapping Applet can be used to demonstrate bootstrapping by creating a confidence interval for a population mean or median. The user can manipulate the population distribution, sample size, and number of resamples. An associated guide gives suggestions for teaching bootstrapping.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A collection of Statistics related Haikus collected by Nicholas Horton from his Math 190 (statistical Methods for Undergraduate Research) course at Smith College in Spring, 2010. These are included in the Statistics Haiku Project at http://www.math.smith.edu/~nhorton/haikustat.html

    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke to use when teaching about choices of binary response data models like the Logistic or Probit models by University of Texas at El Paso professor of Mathematical Sciences, Lawrence Mark Lesser (1964-).

    0
    No votes yet
  • The conception of chance enters in the very first steps of scientific activity in virtue of the fact that no observation is absolutely correct. I think chance is a more fundamental conception that causality; for whether in a concrete case, a cause-effect relation holds or not can only be judged by applying the laws of chance to the observation. is a quote by German and British nobel prize winning physicist Max Born (1882 - 1970). The quote appears in his 1949 book "Natural Philosophy of Cause and Chance" published by Clarendon Press.
    0
    No votes yet

Pages

list