Webinars

  • Publishing in the Statistics Education Research Journal (SERJ)

    Robert delMas, University of Minnesota
    Monday, March 12, 2012 - 2:15pm
    The Statistics Education Research Journal (SERJ) publishes high quality research related to the teaching and learning of statistics. Bob delMas, co-Editor of SERJ, will present characteristics of manuscripts that tend to result in published articles, as well as point out critical flaws that can keep a manuscript from being published in SERJ. Ample time will be provided for the audience to ask questions of the co-Editor.
  • Trashball: A Logistic Regression Classroom Activity

    Chris Morrell, Loyola University
    Tuesday, February 28, 2012 - 2:30pm
    In the early 1990's, the National Science Foundation funded many research projects for improving statistical education. Many of these stressed the need for classroom activities that illustrate important issues of designing experiments, generating quality data, fitting models, and performing statistical tests. This webinar describes such an activity on logistic regression that is useful in second applied statistics courses. The activity involves students attempting to toss a ball into a trash can from various distances. The outcome is whether or not students are successful in tossing the ball into the trash can. This activity and the adjoining homework assignments illustrate the binary nature of a response variable, fitting and interpreting simple and multiple logistic regression models, and the use of odds and odds ratios. Trashball activity website
  • Setting the Tone from Day 1

    Larry Lesser, The University of Texas at El Paso
    Tuesday, January 24, 2012 - 2:30pm
    When a course begins, students may not arrive with abundant background knowledge (and certainly haven't yet done any assigned reading in the textbook), but do arrive with some (mis)conceptions about the course and the discipline. Based largely on the Lesser & Kephart paper in the November 2011 issue of Journal of Statistics Education www.amstat.org/publications/jse/v19n3/lesser.pdf (which you are welcome but not required to read in advance), this webinar gives concrete class-tested activities and process (with rationale) of how instructors can go beyond calling roll and discussing the syllabus and set the tone on a course's opening day. We will also discuss how the process may be applied to other days of the course, to various types of courses, to classes of varying sizes, to meeting times of varying lengths, etc.
  • Teaching Statistical Concepts in an Inverted Classroom

    Bill Rayens, University of Kentucky
    Tuesday, January 10, 2012 - 2:00pm
    After teaching the concepts of statistics and statistical reasoning for almost twenty-five years I became convinced that my lecture-recitation format was inefficient and maybe even counter-productive with respect to student learning. Throw in an excruciating self reflection focused on "what do my students really need me for anyway?" and it quickly became clear that my style and my classroom needed some kind of substantive change. The result was the development of an inverted classroom environment where traditional lecture material is off-loaded as mp4 files, the classroom is used for discovery and discussion, and the recitations are better tailored to the deductive abilities of new TAs. In this presentation we will demonstrate some of what we are doing here at the University of Kentucky in a course that serves approximately 4200 students in a calendar year. We will be sure to point out the things that may not be working that well, in addition to those that are. Questions to Think About Assuming you teach an introductory conceptual statistics course in a lecture/recitation format with TAs in charge of the recitations: Do you use first-year TAs in your recitations? If so, do they have difficulties with appropriately handling conceptual questions and demonstrations? Have you ever thought about what things you say and do in the "lecture" that are truly essential for you to say and do? Are these things that reflect the depth of your knowledge and experience in the field of statistics?
  • Using Simulation Methods to Introduce Inference

    Kari Lock Morgan, Duke University
    Tuesday, December 13, 2011 - 2:00pm
    We discuss how and why we now use simulation methods (bootstrapping and randomization) to introduce fundamental topics of inference (intervals and tests) in an introductory statistics course. We describe ways to make these methods accessible early in the course, demonstrate new user-friendly applets for teaching and using these methods, and discuss some of our experiences with using this approach.
  • Bootstrapping and randomization: Seeing all the moving parts

    Chris J. Wild, University of Auckland
    Friday, November 11, 2011 - 2:30pm
    This webinar is a short visual, narrative journey from the vibrating boxplot imagery of the author's 2009 USCOTS Plenary and Wild et al. (2011) to visualisations of bootstrap confidence intervals and, if time permits, randomisation tests. Software under development will be used and made available as-is to any brave souls willing to live on the edge. References: www.stat.auckland.ac.nz/~wild/09.USCOTSTalk.html Wild, C.J., M. Pfannkuch, M., Regan, M. and Horton, N.J. (2011). Towards more accessible conceptions of statistical Inference (with Discussion). Journal of the Royal Statistical Society A, 174, 247-295.
  • Successful Long-Distance Affairs: Conducting Cross-Institutional Statistics Education Research

    Georgette Nicolaides, Syracuse University; and Leigh Slauson, Capital University
    Tuesday, November 8, 2011 - 2:00pm
    This webinar will discuss the presenters' experiences conducting research with collaborators at several different institutions. Both presenters have in the CAUSE research cluster program for more than two years. This NSF funded program brings together statistics educators earlier in their career for the purposes of research. We will discuss some literature that suggests collaborations have a better chance of publication, the difficulties and the rewards of cross institutional research based on our own experiences and how clusters' view of the research process has changed over these past two years.
  • Interactive Statistics Education using WISE tutorials and applets

    Dale Berger, Amanda Saw, Giovanni Sosa, Justin Mary, and Christopher Pentoney; Claremont Graduate University
    Tuesday, October 11, 2011 - 2:00pm
    This webinar will present the tutorials, applets, and other resources available on the Web Interface for Statistics Education project (wise.cgu.edu). Following an overview of WISE resources, we will demonstrate and discuss how instructors can use interactive applets to help students gain a better intuitive understanding of fundamental concepts like sampling distributions and statistical power. The webinar will conclude with a demonstration of a mini-lecture on statistical power, using an interactive applet to show how statistical power, sample size, effect size, and alpha error rate are interrelated. Student handouts and exercises will be provided.
  • Pinochle Poker: An Activity to Solidify Concepts in Counting and Probability

    Jackie Wroughton & Joe Nolan, Northern Kentucky University
    Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 2:30pm
    We teach counting techniques such as combinations and permutations to aid students in accurately computing the size of large "sample spaces" and "events" without the need to list each individual possibility. We believe based on personal experiences that this material is challenging for students in part due to their desire to be able to perform calculations instantaneously without the need for careful and critical analysis of the problem. We present an activity - using ideas from the games of poker and pinochle - designed to help students expand from basic counting techniques and formulas to begin to think more critically about their subtleties. In addition to involving the advanced levels of critical thinking we want students to experience, the use of poker is advantageous because it represents a real-life situation with which many students are already familiar. Our observations suggest that some students will more readily engage in the activity due to these interests. Complexity is added by utilizing the less familiar Pinochle deck. While this activity has been tailored for use with statistics majors and future teachers at NKU, we believe the activity to be both entertaining and applicable for many different levels of students (including high-school discrete mathematics courses that have substantial probability components). We will discuss the activity including learning outcomes, rationale, and opportunities for teachable moments.
  • Reading and Writing in an Inquiry-Based Introductory Statistics Course

    Adam Childers & Jeff Spielman, Roanoke College
    Tuesday, September 13, 2011 - 2:00pm
    Some of the challenges that we face teaching introductory statistics are the students' fear of mathematics and negative perceptions of the subject that they bring with them as enter the classroom. In an attempt to change these negative associations we have begun teaching theme-based introductory statistics courses that emphasize reading and writing integrated with the usual emphasis on quantitative reasoning. In this presentation we will discuss how using a central theme and incorporating reading and writing has affected both the way we teach the course and the experience that the students have.

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