Webinars

  • Using (and contributing to!) the Chance News Wiki

    Jeanne Albert & Bill Peterson, Middlebury College
    Tuesday, April 13, 2010 - 2:00pm
    This year, Jeanne and Bill assumed co-editorship of the Chance News Wiki, which as of March 15 will be moving to CAUSEweb. The Wiki provides reviews of current news stories that are relevant to teaching statistics and probability, along with links to original articles and related resources. This webinar will describe the various ways that Chance project materials have been used, in areas ranging from traditional introductory statistics to statistical literacy courses to first-year seminars. We will also discuss the mechanics of posting to the Wiki, and hope to inspire some new contributors.
  • Using Concept Maps to Organize Reviews of Literature

    Hollylynne Stohl Lee, North Carolina State University
    Tuesday, April 6, 2010 - 2:00pm
    This is a CAUSE Special Presentation for USCOTS Research Cluster members.
  • Using Chance to Engage AP High School and Undergraduate University Students in the Study of Statistics

    Dalene Stangl, Duke University
    Tuesday, March 9, 2010 - 2:00pm
    During the past 20 years, undergraduate education has shifted from student as passive recipient of information to student as active participant in the classroom. I wrote an article for Chance magazine's 20th anniversary issue titled, "Using Chance to Engage Undergraduates in the Study of Statistics." The article gave examples of activities inspired by Chance magazine articles from the last 20 years. This webinar will take articles from a recent issue of Chance and demonstrate the ease with which any issue can be used to develop class activities that are fun for high school students and undergraduates whether the course is a basic quantitative literacy course, an AP statistics course, an introductory course for non-statistics majors, or a core or elective course for the statistics major.
  • Foundations in Probability to Support Statistical Reasoning

    Hollylynne Stohl Lee, North Carolina State University; and Todd Lee, Elon University
    Tuesday, February 9, 2010 - 2:00pm
    A model for probabilistic reasoning will be discussed that may support students' statistical reasoning. The development of the model and instructional implications are based on theoretical considerations and empirical results from work with middle grades students. Significant time for discussion is planned to get reactions to the model as well as to discuss aspects of probability that participants believe are foundational to building statistical literacy or reasoning.
  • Incorporating computer simulations and visualizations into your teaching

    Marsha Lovett, Carnegie Mellon University
    Tuesday, January 12, 2010 - 2:00pm
    In Statistics as in many disciplines, students need to learn about complex concepts and dynamically changing processes. How can instructors help their students begin to "see" these complex topics the way experts do, and are there tools that can help? In this webinar, I will review key findings on how computer visualizations and simulations can best support student learning and then take those findings to generate effective strategies for teaching with simulations and visualizations.
  • Using Data from the Federal Statistical System to Inspire Students

    Ron Wasserstein, American Statistical Association
    Tuesday, November 10, 2009 - 2:00pm
    Statistics educators are keenly aware of the value of using real data to help students see the relevance and applicability of statistics. The federal statistical agencies have invested in significant efforts to make data accessible and available. In this webinar, Ron Wasserstein will point you to these resources, discussing their uses and limitations.
  • Statistics Video Wrappers: Moving It Out of the Classroom with PreLabs

    Brenda Gunderson, University of Michigan
    Tuesday, September 8, 2009 - 2:00pm
    Many introductory Statistics courses consist of two main components: lecture sections and computer laboratory sections. In the computer labs, students often review fundamental course concepts, learn to analyze data using statistical software, and practice applying their knowledge to real world scenarios. Lab time could be better utilized if students arrived with 1) prior exposure to the core statistical ideas, and 2) a basic familiarity with the statistical software package. To achieve these objectives, PreLabs have been integrated into an introductory statistics course. A simple screen capture software (Jing) was used to create videos. The videos and a very short corresponding assignment together form a PreLab and are made available to students to access at appropriate times in the course. Some PreLabs were created to expose the students to statistical software details. Other PreLabs incorporate an available online learning resource or applet which allows students to gain a deeper understanding of a course concept through simulation and visualization. Not all on-line learning resources are ready to use 'as in' in a course. Some may be lacking a preface or description on how they are to be used; others may use slightly different notation or language than your students are accustomed to; a few may even contain an error or item that needs some clarification. One solution to such difficulties was to create a video wrapper so students can see how the applet works while receiving guidance from the instructor. In this webinar we will share the success story of how one introductory Statistics course integrated these video wrappers into the course and the discuss other possible applications.
  • Sneaking in a few history lessons when teaching statistics

    Kirk Anderson, Grand Valley State University
    Tuesday, August 11, 2009 - 2:00pm
    Many of us, while teaching an introductory statistics course, have mentioned some of the history behind the methodology, perhaps just in passing. We might remark that an English chap by the name of R. A. Fisher is responsible for a great deal of the course content. We could further point out that the statistical techniques used in research today were developed within the last century, for the most part. At most, we might reveal the identity of the mysterious "Student" when introducing the t-test to our class. I propose that we do more of this. This webinar will highlight some opportunities to give brief history lessons while teaching an introductory statistics course.
  • Engaging Students with Disabilities through Universal Design for Learning

    Margo Vreeburg Izzo, The Ohio State University Nisonger Center
    Tuesday, July 14, 2009 - 2:00pm
    Teaching a diverse college population is a challenge that most college faculty face each day. Universal Design for Learning is an approach to teaching that takes into consideration different student experiences, different cultures, and other issues such as disability. By examining curriculum and instruction through the context of universal design, you can engage as many students as possible in your college classroom and increase achievement by engaging students through a variety of methods ranging from electronic voting machines during class lectures to podcasts to deliver/reinforce essential course content.
  • Teaching Bayesian Inference in Undergraduate Service Courses

    Dalene Stangl, Duke University
    Tuesday, June 9, 2009 - 2:00pm
    This webinar will present the core materials I use to teach Bayesian inference in undergraduate service courses geared toward social science, natural science, pre-med, and/or pre-law students. During the semester this material is presented after completing all chapters of the book Statistics by Freedman, Pisani, and Purves. It uses math at the level of basic algebra.

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