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Webinars

  • Strategies for successful implementation of collaborative student assessment in face-to-face and online statistics classes

    Audbjorg Bjornsdottir, University of Minnesota
    Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 12:00pm
    This presentation will be about collaborative tests, where students are allowed to work together during the exam. It will include a review about the effectiveness and different formats of collaborative tests along with successful strategies for implementing them in face-to-face and online statistics classes.
  • Investing in the Next Generation through Innovative and Outstanding Strategies (INGenIOuS): Report of outcomes from a recent workshop

    A. John Bailer, Miami University
    Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 12:00pm
    The need for a larger proportion of the workforce to enter well equipped with mathematics and statistics skills has been acknowledged in a number of recent reports. To address this need, action must be taken by all stakeholders involved in preparing students for 21st century workforce demands. A collaboration of mathematics and statistics professional societies recently culminated in a workshop focused on identifying strategic steps that might be taken to dramatically increase the flow of mathematical sciences professionals into the workforce pipeline.
  • Updating the Guidelines for Undergraduate Programs in Statistics

    Nicholas J. Horton, Amherst College
    Tuesday, November 12, 2013 - 12:00pm
    Undergraduate study of statistics has been growing in recent years, with the number of students completing stats majors in the United States doubling in the past 5 years. At the same time, the amount and complexity of data being collected increases almost without bound. What should students completing undergraduate majors, minors or concentrations in statistics learn in order to help analyze this flood of information? The American Statistical Association endorsed guidelines in this area in 2000, and a workgroup is now considering what needs to be changed and amplified from the earlier report and supporting materials. In this webinar, participants will hear more about the process, learn about and identify key issues to be considered, and have the opportunity to make suggestions about areas and topics to explore.
  • Connecting Research to Practice in Statistics Education

    Dennis Pearl, The Ohio State University
    Tuesday, September 10, 2013 - 12:00pm
    This webinar will describe the motivation and summarize the major points of a recently released report on connecting research and practice in statistics education. The report seeks to foster productivity and coherence in statistics education research by providing a portal to the statistics education literature, guidance on important priorities in the field, and the impetus for development and wide use of instruments needed to address fundamental questions in the field.
  • Reaching Students with Passion-Driven, Project-Based Statistics

    Lisa Dierker, Wesleyan University
    Tuesday, June 11, 2013 - 12:00pm
    Lisa Dierker will offer reflections on the pedagogical design and experience of teaching her NSF-funded, passion-driven, project-based introductory statistics course both on campus, at Wesleyan University, and within the Massive Open On-line Course (MOOC) environment. www.wesleyan.edu/qac/curriculum
  • Teaching data analysis to 10,000+ at a time

    Jeff Leek, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
    Tuesday, May 7, 2013 - 2:00pm
    In this webinar I will discuss my Coursera class "Data Analysis" that was offered for free. I will discuss the course and educational objectives, the platform, and issues that arise when scaling statistics education to a large audience.
  • Teach how to teach, communicate how to communicate, and learn how to learn

    Xiao-Li Meng, Harvard University
    Tuesday, April 9, 2013 - 2:00pm
    We will briefly review the development and evolution of Stat 303: The Art and Practice of Teaching Statistics, a required year-long course for all entering Ph.D. students in the Department of Statistics at Harvard University. The course started in 2005-2006, and has been revised annually to address students' feedback and evolving goals, as listed in the title. Dr. Meng will talk from his syllabus, which he will also display on the screen. Participants can follow the talk/discussions based on the following handouts. Feel free to make copies for note taking.
  • Evaluating Innovative Courses in Introductory Statistics: Resources from the eATLAS Project

    Elizabeth Fry & Rebekah Isaak, University of Minnesota
    Tuesday, March 12, 2013 - 1:45pm
    In this webinar, we will provide an overview of goals and methods of curriculum evaluation that are appropriate for use in statistics education projects, share details of newly developed instruments that may be used in evaluation of these projects, and provide an example of evaluation methods used in the CATALST project along with a summary of what was learned in this evaluation. Additional information on the NSF-funded eATLAS (Evaluation and Assessment of Teaching and Learning About Statistics, NSF DUE 1044812 & 1043141) project will be shared regarding collection of national data to use in future evaluations.
  • ENABLEing Student Choice and Instructor Flexibility: Hyflex in Action

    Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University
    Tuesday, December 11, 2012 - 2:00pm
    Introduce yourself to the new model being used in a large, introductory statistics course. Technology is creatively leveraged to provide students with rich, flexible learning opportunities, timely instructor feedback, and options for making lecture attendance suitable to their learning style. Experience the new ways students are engaging with lecture content through the use of tablet PCs, interactive polling, and a backchannel. This webinar will give you just a taste of the ideas, but hopefully you will be interested in more.
  • Experiences with and Assessments of an Open-Access, Online Course for Introductory Statistics

    Marsha Lovett, Carnegie Mellon University; and Oded Meyer, Georgetown University
    Tuesday, October 9, 2012 - 2:00pm
    As part of the Open Learning Initiative (OLI), Carnegie Mellon University was funded to develop a web-based introductory statistics course, openly and freely available to individual online students so they could learn effectively without an instructor. In practice, this course is often used in "blended" mode, i.e., to complement face-to-face classroom instruction. In this webinar, we will demonstrate how students interact with the course and how the different activities were designed to provide pedagogical scaffolding. We will then discuss ways in which instructors have used the online course to support their teaching and provide a demonstration of the Instructor's Learning Dashboard, a tool which continuously provides detailed feedback on students' learning and progress. We will conclude by summarizing a set of studies in which we assessed the online course's effectiveness in blended mode. Unfortunately, this webinar was not recorded due to a technical problem. We apologize.

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