Survival Analysis

  • "The purpose of this electronic service is to provide access to a collection of datasets suitable for teaching statistics. The datasets are stored either locally or on other computers throughout the world. The datasets have been organized by statistical technique to make it easier for you to find a dataset appropriate for your pedagogical needs. When a dataset is appropriate for several statistical techniques, it will appear under several categories. Each dataset consists of three files: one is a description of the data; the others are an ascii (text) file of the data and an Excel file of the data."
    0
    No votes yet
  • This site shows the code you would use to replicate the examples in Applied Survival Analysis, by Hosmer and Lemeshow. It has code in Stata, R, and SAS.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A sketch by Anastasia Mandel reinterpreting View of Mount Fuji by Utagawa Hiroshige (1859) with the statistical caption "Survival analysis." This is part of a collection of sketches by Anastasia Mandel and their accompanying statistical captions discussed in the paper "How art helps to understand statistics" (Model Assisted Statistics and Applications, 2009) by Stan Lipovetsky and Igor Mandel in volume 4 pages 313-324. Free to use in classrooms and on course websites.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This site provides a list of graduate programs in Statistics and closely-related fields which respond to inquiries for information via e-mail. Links to programs are provided, in addition to information about contact persons within each program.
    0
    No votes yet
  • The true logic of this world is the calculus of probabilities. This is a quote of Scottish physicist and mathematician James Clerk Maxwell (1831 - 1879). The quote is found on page 197 in volume 1 of "The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell, (James Clerk Maxwell and Peter Michael Harman, ed.)".
    0
    No votes yet
  • January 26, 2010 webinar presented by Alicia Gram, Smith College, and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. This webinar describes an activity that uses data collected from an experiment looking at the relationship between two categorical variables: whether a cotton plant was exposed to spider mites; and did the plant contract Wilt disease? The activity uses randomization to explore whether there is a difference between the occurrence of the disease with and without the mites. The webinar includes a discussion of the learning goals of the activity, followed by an implementation of the activity then suggestions for assessment. The implementation first uses a physical simulation, then a simulation using technology. (Extra materials, including Fathom instructions for the simulation, available for download free of charge).
    0
    No votes yet
  • Statistics are to baseball what a flaky crust is to Mom's apple pie. is a quote by American television journalist Harry Reasoner (1923 - 1991). The quote was said in a story on the news magazine show, "60 minutes."
    0
    No votes yet
  • I can prove anything by statistics except the truth is a quote by British politician George Canning (1770 - 1827). The quote is found on page 587 of the 1908 book "Dictionary of Thoughts" edited by Tryon Edwards. The quote may be used to illustrate the idea that statistical inference is often geared toward demonstrating what is unlikely to be true rather than proving what is true.
    0
    No votes yet
  • February 9, 2010 T&L webinar presented by Hollylynne Lee (North Carolina State University) and Todd Lee (Elon University), and hosted by Jackie Miller (The Ohio State University). A model for probabilistic reasoning will be discussed that may support students' statistical reasoning. The development of the model and instructional implications are based on theoretical considerations and empirical results from work with middle grades students. Significant time for discussion is planned to get reactions to the model as well as to discuss aspects of probability that participants believe are foundational to building statistical literacy or reasoning.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about various graphic displays. The cartoon is number 688 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.
    0
    No votes yet

Pages

list