Significance Testing Principles

  • A 5-panel gif animation than can be used in discussing setting up null and alternative hypotheses and the concept of a type I error. The idea for the animation was provided by Dr. Karen Banks from Indiana University and received second place in the 2015 A-mu-sing contest. The idea for the final panel of the gif (regarding Type I error) came from the participants at a breakout session on the use of cartoons and songs in teaching statistics at the 2015 U.S. Conference On Teaching Statistics. The cartoons are drawn by British cartoonist John Landers (first of two animations arising from the USCOTS session).
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  • A 5-panel gif animation than can be used in discussing setting up null and alternative hypotheses and the concept of a type I error. The idea for the animation was provided by Dr. Karen Banks from Indiana University and received second place in the 2015 A-mu-sing contest. The idea for the final panel of the gif (regarding Type I error) came from the participants at a breakout session on the use of cartoons and songs in teaching statistics at the 2015 U.S. Conference On Teaching Statistics. The cartoons are drawn by British cartoonist John Landers (second of two animations arising from the USCOTS session).
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  • A song about the various cautions that go with interpreting the P-value especially the large sample caution, a strict reliance on the 5% significance level, and errors in interpreting results as proof of a hypothesis. The song and musical arrangements in the video were written by Michael Greenacre of Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona and may be sung to the tune of Irving Berlin's "There's no business like show business." The lyrics were sung by Gurdeep Stephens in the recording. The video took second place in the 2015 A-mu-sing contest.
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  • A joke for use with discussions about the relationship between sample size and power or in discussing the large sample caution in significance testing.
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  • "Scaffolding" is a poem by Scottish poet Eveline Pye from Glasgow Caledonin University. The poem was originally published in the September 2011 issue of the bimonthly magazine Significance, in an article about Eveline Pye's statistical poetry. "Scaffolding" might be used in course discussions of the importance of checking assumptions in the application of statistical methods or of the value of statistical sleuthing in discovering hidden relationships.
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  • A cartoon to teach about the average and about positive versus negative skew. The cartoon was created by Diane L. Evans from Rose-Human Institute of Technology and won an honorable mention in the CAUSE 2013 A-Mu-sing contest.
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  • A poem for use in teaching that causation is not correlation and the Pearson Chi-Square test. The poem was written by Dr. Nyaradzo Mvududu of the Seattle Pacific University School of Education. The poem won a prize in the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition.
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  • A video to teach about the central limit theorem and various issues in one-sample hypothesis testing. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 1988 song "I'm Gonna Be (500 miles)" by the Scottish band The Proclaimers. The video took second place in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
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  • A video to teach about principles of Analysis of Variance. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 1984 song "Hallelujah" by Canadian songwriter Leonard Cohen. The video took third place in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
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  • A video to dispel myths about Statistics and excite students early in a course. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 2000 song "Where Are You, Christmas? " written by James Horner and Will Jennings for the movie "How the Grinch Stole Christmas". The video received an honorable mention in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
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