Scatterplot

  • A cartoon to be used in discussing density functions, scatterplots, and correlation. The plot is humorously labeled a density function – but is more readily interpreted as a scatterplot (in class discussions try to pin down how to interpret x and y). As a scatterplot, it shows a fairly clear (non-linear) association between x and y but would have a correlation of essentially zero. The cartoon is #1438 in the web comic Piled Higher and Deeper by Panamanian cartoonist Jorge Cham (1976- ): see www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1438. Free for use in classrooms and course websites with acknowledgement (i.e. "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham, www.phdcomics.com)
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  • This online software allows you to load data and make professional-looking graphs with it. Graph types are basic (scatterplot, line plot, bar charts, etc.), statistical (histograms, box plots), scientific (error bars, heat map, contour), 3D charts, and financial (e.g. time series). Other graphs are available with the paid pro version. Log in is required, which allows you to upload data and save it for next use.
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  • This webpage provides an active learning lesson for linear regression. Resources include an in-class student activity sheet for two different levels of classes (Algebra I and Junior), a PowerPoint showing faces of famous people, and sheet with updated (to the end of current year) actual ages of the celebrities.
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  • A cartoon that might be used in discussing excessive interim analyses. The cartoon is #24 in the "Life in Research" series at www.vadio.com. Free to use with attribution in the classroom or on course websites.
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  • A cartoon to teach about outliers in scatterplots. The cartoon is #114 in the "Life in Research" series at www.vadio.com. Free to use with attribution in the classroom or on course websites.
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  • A webpage in which links are provided to histograms of sample statistics (mean, median, standard deviation, maximum etc.) as a function of sample size. Each time the REFRESH button is clicked a new set of 2000 samples is generated.
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  • Luck is the residue of design is a quote by American baseball executive Branch Rickey. The quote appeared in the February 21, 1946 issue of the "Sporting News". The quote is also often attributed to 17th century English poet John Milton - but that source has not been confirmed.
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  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about scatterplots and correlation. The cartoon is number 388 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.
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  • A cartoon to teach about issues in designing a well-controlled experiment. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • This page computes a variety of descriptive statistics and creates a stem and leaf plot. Enter data in the text area, specify a delimiter (Space, Return, Tab, New line), and click "Compute". The page returns sample size, mean, median, trimmed mean, trimean, minimum, maximum, range, first quartile, third quartile, semi-interquartile range, standard deviation, variance, standard error of the mean, skew, and kurtosis. Key Word: Calculator; Summary Statistics.
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