Regression

  • This collection of data can be used for many useful statistical analyses. Data and description are in a separate file and useful for SAS data analysis too. Data are categorized by analysis type, hence easy to pic relevant data sets accordingly. The data can be used for many analysis such as, Categorical data analysis, Polynomial Linear, Nonlinear, Logistic, Poisson, Negative Binomial Regression analysis, Response Surface Regression, Binary Response Regression, Time Series Data,1-Way ANOVA/ Independent Samples t-test, Multi-Factor ANOVA, and many other data analysis.
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  • A video for use in teaching about the dangers of extrapolating well beyond the range of the data in linear regression. The lyrics and Powerpoint components of the video were written by Michael Posner while the vocals were done by Reena Freedman of Villanova University and won first place in the video category of the 2017 A-mu-sing contest. The lyrics parody the song "How Far I'll Go" from the Disney animated feature film Moana (sung by Alessia Cara for the movie soundtrack).
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  • This simulation illustrates least squares regression and how the least squares solution minimizes the sum of the squared residuals. The applet demonstrates, in a visual manner, various concepts related to least squares regression. These include residuals, sum of squares, the mean line, how the line of best fit is determined, and how the line of least squares solution minimizes the sum of the squared residuals.
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  • A joke to use when teaching about choices of binary response data models like the Logistic or Probit models by University of Texas at El Paso professor of Mathematical Sciences, Lawrence Mark Lesser (1964-).
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  • ... if the difference isn't different enough to make a difference, what's the difference? is a quote by American agricultural statistician Victor Chew (1923 - ). The quote is found in his 1980 paper "Testing differences among means: correct interpretation and some alternatives" ("HortScience" pages 467-470). The quote can be used in discussions of practical significance versus statistical significance.
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  • Avoid Linear extrapolation ... The turkey's first 1000 days are a seemingly unending succession of gradually improving circumstances confirmed by daily experience. What happens on Day 1001? Thanksgiving. The quote is by John E. Sener (1954 - ) of Sener Learning services found in the on-line article "Strategies for Effective `20/20 Vision` -- #1: Avoid Linear Extrapolation" at www.senerlearning.net/?q=node/176. The quote is paraphrasing the turkey metaphor made famous by Bertrand Russell and Nassim Nicholas Taleb.
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  • A joke about the economic value of a degree in the applied mathematical sciences compared to a more theoretical degree.
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  • This is my take on the ubiquitous M&Ms counting activity. Each student records the color proportions in a fun-size bag of M&Ms. We pool the class data and run a Chi-Square goodness-of-fit test to determine whether or not the color proportions match those claimed on the manufacturer's website. We consistently find that the proportions do not match. The blue M&Ms, in particular, are underrepresented. This activity also includes a review of the 1-proportion z confidence interval.
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  • A cartoon to teach about the need for statistical techniques in drawing out the salient features in massive data sets. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • A cartoon to teach about the interpretation of confidence statements. The cartoon plays on the idea of what would happen if the same process was repeated over-and-over again. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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