Multivariate Quantitative Relationships

  • This activity begins with an instructor demonstration followed by a student out-of-class assignment. Students will observe their instructor create a scatterplot and observe how the correlation coefficient changes when outlier points are added. Students are then given a follow up assignment, which guides them through the applet. In addition, the assignment provides insight about outliers and their effect on correlation. This activity will show exactly how outliers numerically change the correlation coefficient value and to what degree.
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  • This visualization activity combines student data collection with the use of an applet to enhance the understanding of the distributions of slope and intercept in simple linear regression models. The applet simulates a linear regression plot and the corresponding intercept and slope histograms. The program allows the user to change settings such as slope, standard deviation, sample size, and more. Students will then see theoretical distributions of the slope and intercept and how they compare to the histograms generated by the simulated linear regression lines.
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  • Do not put your faith in what statistics say until you have carefully considered what they do not say. A quote by English professor William Whyte Watt (1912 - 1996) in his book "An American Rhetoric" (Rinehart and Co.; 1958 3rd edition, page 382).

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  • Indeed, it is always probable that something improbable will happen. A quote by American lawyer and Georgia Supreme Court jurist Logan Edwin Bleckley (1827 - 1907) written in his opinion in the case of Warren v. Purtell in 1879. The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.

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  • The facts that we dislike we call theories; the theories that we cherish we call facts. a quote from American legal scholar Felix Solomon Cohen (1907 - 1953) in his paper "Field Theory and Judicial Logic" published in the "Yale Law Journal" (vol. 59, 1950 pages 238-272).

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  • Statistics is the art of stating in precise terms that which one does not know. A quote by American Statistician William Henry Kruskal (1919 - 2005) in his article "Statistics, Moliere, and Henry Adams," in "American Scientist Magazine" (1967; vol. 55, page 417).The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.

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  • A cartoon to teach how statistics helps to isolate the underlying causes behind the difference between comparison groups. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • A cartoon for general use with discussions of election polls. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Steve MacEachern (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • A cartoon to teach about how researchers usually hope to find differences between treatment and control (or do they?). Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • A cartoon to review key themes and caveats in introductory statistics. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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