Design of Experiments

  • A song to be used in discussing three key principles of experimentation – control, randomization, and replication. The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the theme song written in 2004 by Mark Harrison and Blaise Smith for the animated tv show Spongebob Squarepants. Also, an accompanying video may be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWX2s4WZWx8

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  • A song that may be used in discussing the value of blocking (or matching) in reducing variation in an experiment.  The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the 1966 Beach Boys hit "Good Vibrations".  Also, an accompanying video may be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPCnjwyH8As

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  • A searchable database of approximately 600 applets for teaching introductory statistics topics, including graphical displays, descriptive statistics, probability concepts, random variables, sampling and sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, chi-square tests, correlation and regression, time series and forecasting, decision analysis, and quality control charts. Applets are arranged by topic and intended use. Information on each applet includes source and url as well as a brief description.
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  • A cartoon to teach basic ideas about survey sampling. The cartoon is #1271 in the web comic Piled Higher and Deeper by Panamanian cartoonist Jorge Cham (1976- ): see www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1271. It originally appeared in that series on January 20, 201. Free for use in classrooms and course websites with acknowledgement (i.e. "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham www.phdcomics.com should be on or next to the cartoon in your display). Commercial users must contact the copyright holder for permissions.
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  • A sketch by Anastasia Mandel reinterpreting Hat Shop by August Macke (1914) with the statistical caption "Discrete choice models, with a hat matrix." This is part of a collection of sketches by Anastasia Mandel and their accompanying statistical captions discussed in the paper "How art helps to understand statistics" (Model Assisted Statistics and Applications, 2009) by Stan Lipovetsky and Igor Mandel in volume 4 pages 313-324. Free to use in classrooms and on course websites.
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  • A sketch by Anastasia Mandel reinterpreting Government Bureau by George Tooker (1956) with the statistical caption "Queuing theory and implementation." This is part of a collection of sketches by Anastasia Mandel and their accompanying statistical captions discussed in the paper "How art helps to understand statistics" (Model Assisted Statistics and Applications, 2009) by Stan Lipovetsky and Igor Mandel in volume 4 pages 313-324. Free to use in classrooms and on course websites.
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  • As mentioned on the home page of this resource "This site presents workbook-style, project-based material that emphasizes real world applications and conceptual understanding. This material is designed to give students a sense of the importance and allure of statistics early in their college career. By incorporating many of the successful reforms of the introductory statistics course into a wide range of more advanced topics we hope that students in any discipline can realize the intellectual content and broad applicability of statistics."
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  • August 25, 2009 Activity webinar presented by Michelle Everson, University of Minnesota and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. In a classroom setting, students can engage in hands-on activities in order to better understand certain concepts and ideas. Replicating hands-on activities in an online environment, however, can be a challenge for instructors. The purpose of this webinar is to present an applet that was created to replicate a "Post-it Note" activity commonly used in classroom sections of an undergraduate introductory statistics course at University of Minnesota. The Post-it Note activity is meant to help students develop a more conceptual understanding of the mean and the median by moving a set of Post-it Notes along a number line. During the webinar, participants have an opportunity to see and experience just how online students are able to interact with an applet named the "Sticky Centers" applet, and the webinar presents the kinds of materials and assignments that have been created to use in conjunction with this applet. The webinar ends with a preview of a newer applet that is being developed in order to replicate the famous "Gummy Bears in Space" activity (presented in Schaeffer, Gnanadesikan, Watkins & Witmer, 1996). A supplemental student handout is available for download free of charge.
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  • September 22, 2009 Activity Webinar presented by Diane Evans, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. This webinar is based on an activity found at www.lhs.logan.k12.ut.us/~jsmart/tank.htm and other on-line resources (see references). During World War II, the British and U.S. statisticians used estimation methods to deduce the productivity of Germany's armament factories using serial numbers found on captured equipment, such as tanks. The tanks were numbered in a manner similar to 1, 2, 3, ..., N, and the goal of the allies was to estimate the population maximum N from their collected sample of serial numbers. The purpose of this activity is to introduce students to the concept of an unbiased estimator of a population parameter. Students develop several estimators for the parameter N and compare them by running simulations in Minitab. Extra materials available for download free of charge.
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  • The best way to predict the future is to invent it. This is a quote by American computer scientist Alan C. Kay (1940 - ). The quote was said at a 1971 meeting of Xerox Corporation's Palo Alto Research Center.
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