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Statistical Topic

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  • Song about the use of the 5-number summary to describe skewed data as an alternative to the mean and standard deviation. May be sung to the tune of the 1979 song "I Will Survive" by Gloria Gaynor. Lyrics written by Sheila O'Leary Weaver. The song took first place in the song category in the 2007 A-Mu-Sing competition. Musical accompaniment realization are by Joshua Lintz and vocals are by Mariana Sandoval from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • A cartoon to teach about one difficulty in conducting medical research compared to education research arising from problems in obtaining informed consent from subjects. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.

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  • November 23, 2010 Activity Webinar presented by Stacey Hancock, Reed College, Jennifer Noll, Portland State University, Sean Simpson, Westchester Community College, and Aaron Weinberg, Ithaca College, and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. Extra materials available for download free of charge. Many instructors ask students to demonstrate the frequentist notion of probability using a simulation early in an intro stats course. Typically, the simulation involves dice or coins, which give equal (and known) probabilities. How about a simulation involving an unknown probability? This webinar discusses an experiment involving rolling (unbalanced) pigs. Since the probabilities are not equal, this experiment also allows the instructor to have students think about the concept of fairness within games.

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  • Probability is expectation founded upon partial knowledge. is a quote by George Boole (1815 - 1864) - the English logician and philosopher for whom Boolean logic is named. The quote is found in chapter 16 of his 1853 book "An Investigation of the Laws of Thought". The book can be found on-line through the Gutenberg project at www.gutenberg.org/etext/15114.

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  • The way to do research is to attack the facts at the point of greatest astonishment is a quote by British writer Celia Green (1935 - ) from her book "The Decline and Fall of Science" (Hamilton Ltd., 1976). The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.

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  • A cartoon suitable for a course website or classroom use in teaching about sample surveys (election polls). The cartoon is number 500 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

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  • A song parody about how teachers lament that their students do not learn to think. Yet the exams they give only test memorization of rote facts. May be sung to the tune of Pete Seeger's "Where Have All the Flowers Gone." Lyrics written by Dennis Pearl with lots of help from Lawrence Mark Lesser (University of Texas, El Paso). Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • Song contains concepts and terms associated with linear regression. May be sung to the tune of "I Walk the Line" (Johnny Cash). Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • A song about the fit of linear regression, describing the difference between observed and fitted values and related aspects. May be sung to the tune of "Mexican Hat Dance" (traditional). Recorded June 26, 2009 at the OSU Whisper Room: Larry Lesser, vocals/guitar; Justin Slauson, engineer. This song is part of an NSF-funded library of interactive songs that involved students creating responses to prompts that are then included in the lyrics (see www.causeweb.org/smiles for the interactive version of the song, a short reading covering the topic, and an assessment item).

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  • Song addresses strategies and myths for playing a state lottery, incorporating concepts of probability, independence, and expected value. May be sung to the tune of "The Gambler" (Don Schlitz). This song kicked off USCOTS 2009 and an earlier version appeared in Winter 2002 "STATS". Recorded June 26, 2009 at the OSU Whisper Room: Larry Lesser, vocals; Justin Slauson, engineer.

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