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  • Can you "see" a group mean difference, just by eyeballing the data? Is your gut feeling aligned to the formal index of evidence, the Bayes factor?

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  • Visualizing the Bayes factor (quantification of evidence supporting a null or altermative hypothesis) using the urn model.

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  • This page presents a series of tutorials and interdisciplinary case studies that can be used in a variety of blended as well as brick-and-mortar courses. The materials can be used in introductory level data science courses as well as more advanced data science or statistics courses.  These materials assume that students have a basic prior knowledge of R or Rstudio.

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  • Correspondence analysis is a method allowing you to describe synthetically a contingency table in which homogeneous individuals are classified on two criterias (or categorical variables, continuous ones being usable if discretized).  This resource tells how it can be used, graphical representations of this process, and gives examples of it in action. 

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  • Statistics forum for questions/conversations ranging from homework problems in statistics and probability and help using statistical software to statistical research inquiries and career advising.

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  • This applet builds confidence intervals for the percentage of orange candies in box with two colors of candies. A smaller box visualizes the sample, and a graph keeps track of the location of the confidence interval. Students can take one sample (producing one CI) repeatedly, or take 100 random samples at once. The population percentage is hidden from view unless the student asks to see it, in which case it is displayed on the graph of confidence intervals. This allows the students to see whether each interval "hits" or "misses". Several parameters can be varied: sample size, confidence level and number of samples. A set of questions alongside the applet guides students.

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  • This issue contains articles about Karl Pearson (150 years after his birth); finding more ways to make learning statistics fun; simulating capture-recapture sampling in Excel and by hand; common misconceptions in statistics; a correlation-based puzzler and a STAT.DOKU puzzle.

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  • This site is a collection of interesting stories in the news that relate to statistics, major league baseball standings, links to textbooks, and links to applets. It also contains some reflections on statistical issues from retired professor John Marden (from University of Illiois at Urbana-Champaign).

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  • This site is a collection of resources related to experiments. The site includes references, resources, and articles related to the scientific method, experimental research, ethics in research, and research design. It also includes tips on writing scientific papers, and there are several statistics tutorials on the site. Another interesting feature of the site is a collection of case studies that include descriptions of famous research studies in fields like social psychology, sociology, physics, biology, and medicine.

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  • This blog will be about access: access to data and access to analysis tools. This blog will be about data privacy, and data sharing. This blog will be about people who use data to better their lives and the lives of others. This blog is meant for anyone wishing to become a citizen statistician, but in particular for statistics teachers-those who help empower citizens to become citizen statisticians.

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