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Statistical Topic

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  • January 12, 2010 T&L webinar presented by Marsha Lovett (Carnegie Mellon University) and hosted by Jackie Miller (The Ohio State University). In Statistics as in many disciplines, students need to learn about complex concepts and dynamically changing processes. How can instructors help their students begin to "see" these complex topics the way experts do, and are there tools that can help? In this webinar, I will review key findings on how computer visualizations and simulations can best support student learning and then take those findings to generate effective strategies for teaching with simulations and visualizations.

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  • June 22, 2010 Activity webinar presented by Paul Roback, St. Olaf College and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. This webinar describes an in-class activity, motivated by Case Study 1.1.1 in The Statistical Sleuth, in which students compose haiku poems about statistics. Their poems are used to introduce two-sample t-tests and randomization tests. In addition, the in-class experiment leads to good discussion about experimental design issues, where students compare our design to the actual experiment described in Amabile et al.(1985) "Motivation and Creativity: Effects of Motivational Orientation on Creative Writers", Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 48(2): 393-399. I use this activity on the first day of our second course in applied statistics (Statistical Modeling), but it could easily be used in an introductory course as well. Examples of haiku poems which have resulted from this activity can be found under CAUSEweb > Resources > Fun > Poem (direct link), or at www.causeweb.org/cwis/SPT--FullRecord.php?ResourceId=1883.

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  • May 25, 2010 Activity webinar presented by Ivan Ramler, St. Lawrence University and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. This webinar discusses an undergraduate Mathematical Statistics course project based on the popular video game Guitar Hero. The project included: 1) developing an estimator to address the research objective "Are notes missed at random?", 2) learning bootstrapping techniques and R programming skills to conduct hypothesis tests and 3) evaluating the quality of the estimator(s) under certain sets of scenarios.

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  • In this module, students can test their knowledge of levels of measurement by attempting to determine the the level of measurement of ten different variables. For each variable, a statement is also provided and students can indicate whether the statement about the variable is valid or invalid (given the way in which the variable was measured). There is also a brief "refresher" included here about levels of measurement.

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  • This 6 minute 39 second video can be used to teach the difference between correlation and causation. For example, that a relationship between X and Y might be explained by X causing Y, Y causing X, or a third factor that drives them both. The video is episode #109 (Nov 10, 2009) in the Psych Files podcast series produced and hosted by Michael A. Britt, Ph.D. at www.thepsychfiles.com. Video is free to use in the classroom or on course websites under a non-commercial ShareAlike creative commons license.

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  • Thirty years ago I was diagnosed with motor neurone disease, and given two and a half years to live. I have always wondered how they could be so precise about the half. A quote from a BBC interview (February 18, 1996) of theoretical physicist Stephen William Hawking (1942 - 2018).

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  • This applet demonstrates the concept of power. Users select the hypothesized mean, the alternative mean, the sample size, and the number of samples. The applet shows the hypothesized histogram and the alternative histogram. Users then select either the level of significance and set alpha or the rejection region and set the test statistic. The applet then shows the p-value (in red) and power (in green). User can also determine the direction of the test by clicking the inequality sign.

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  • This page of Statistical Java describes 11 different probability distributions including the Binomial, Poisson, Negative Binomial, Geometric, T, Chi-squared, Gamma, Weibull, Log-Normal, Beta, and F. Each distribution has its own applet in which users can manipulate the parameters to see how the distribution changes. The parameters are described on the main page as well as situations that would use each distribution. The equations of the distributions are not given. To select between the different applets you can click on Statistical Theory, Probability Distributions and then the Main Page. At the bottom of this page you can make your applet selection. This page was formerly located at http://www.stat.vt.edu/~sundar/java/applets/

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  • (Uses JAVA)  Some basic statistical analysis tools that allow the user to input their own data or use the pre-existing data and perform the desired test (e.g ANOVA, Descriptive, t-test, chi-square, correlation and regression).

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  • This resource defines and explains standard deviation and the normal distribution.

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