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  • In this video (which lasts almost 20 minutes), statistics guru Hans Rosling debunks myths about the so-called "developing world."
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  • In this video (which lasts a little over 21 minutes), Oxford mathematician Peter Donnelly reveals the common mistakes humans make in interpreting statistics -- and the devastating impact these errors can have on the outcome of criminal trials.
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  • In this short 3 minute video, mathematician and magician Arthur Benjamin offers a bold proposal on how to make math education relevant in the digital age.
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  • In this 20 minute video, doctor and researcher Hans Rosling uses his fascinating data-bubble software to burst myths about the developing world. The video includes new analysis on China and the post-bailout world, mixed with classic data shows.
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  • An important idea in statistics is that the amount of data matters. We often teach this with formulas --- the standard error of the mean, the t-statistic, etc. --- in which the sample size appears in a denominator as √n. This is fine, so far as it goes, but it often fails to connect with a student's intuition. In this presentation, I'll describe a kinesthetic learning activity --- literally a random walk --- that helps drive home to students why more data is better and why the square-root arises naturally and can be understood by simple geometry. Students remember this activity and its lesson long after they have forgotten the formulas from their statistics class.
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  • August 25, 2009 Activity webinar presented by Michelle Everson, University of Minnesota and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. In a classroom setting, students can engage in hands-on activities in order to better understand certain concepts and ideas. Replicating hands-on activities in an online environment, however, can be a challenge for instructors. The purpose of this webinar is to present an applet that was created to replicate a "Post-it Note" activity commonly used in classroom sections of an undergraduate introductory statistics course at University of Minnesota. The Post-it Note activity is meant to help students develop a more conceptual understanding of the mean and the median by moving a set of Post-it Notes along a number line. During the webinar, participants have an opportunity to see and experience just how online students are able to interact with an applet named the "Sticky Centers" applet, and the webinar presents the kinds of materials and assignments that have been created to use in conjunction with this applet. The webinar ends with a preview of a newer applet that is being developed in order to replicate the famous "Gummy Bears in Space" activity (presented in Schaeffer, Gnanadesikan, Watkins & Witmer, 1996). A supplemental student handout is available for download free of charge.
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  • Many of us, while teaching an introductory statistics course, have mentioned some of the history behind the methodology, perhaps just in passing. We might remark that an English chap by the name of R. A. Fisher is responsible for a great deal of the course content. We could further point out that the statistical techniques used in research today were developed within the last century, for the most part. At most, we might reveal the identity of the mysterious "Student" when introducing the t-test to our class. I propose that we do more of this. This webinar will highlight some opportunities to give brief history lessons while teaching an introductory statistics course.
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  • This song is an ode to bad teaching in statistics written by Dennis Pearl to be sung to the tune of Roger Miller's 1965 classic country/pop tune "King of the Road." Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • November 13, 2007 Teaching and Learning webinar presented by Michael Rodriguez and Andrew Zieffler, University of Minnesota, ad hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. This webinar includes an introduction to the idea of assessment for learning - assessments that support learning, enhance learning, and provides additional learning opportunities that support instruction. Several fundamental measurement tools are described to support the development of effective assessments that work.
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  • December 11, 2007 Teaching and Learning webinar presented by Mark L. Berenson, Montclair State University, and hosted by Jackie Miller, he Ohio State University. As we consider how we might improve our introductory statistics courses, we are constrained by a variety of environmental/logistical and pedagogical issues that must be addressed if we want our students to complete the course saying it was useful, it was relevant and practical, and that it increased their communicational, computational, technological and analytical skills. If not properly considered, such issues may result in the course being considered unsatisfying, incomprehensible, and/or unnecessarily obtuse. This Webinar focuses on key course content concerns that must be addressed and engages participants in discussing resolutions. Participants also had the opportunity to describe and discuss other content barriers to effective statistical pedagogy.
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