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  • This dataset contains information on temperature, precipitation, and weather stations for 48 states. The data is available in Excel and rich text formats.
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  • This applet generates confidence intervals for means or proportions. The options for confidence intervals for means include "z with sigma," "z with s," or "t." The options for confidence intervals for proportions are "Wald," "Adjusted Wald," or "Score." Users set the population parameters, sample size, number of intervals, and confidence level. Click "Sample," and the applet will graph the intervals. Intervals shown in green contain the true population mean or proportion, while intervals in red do not. The true mean or proportion is shown by a blue line. The applet displays the proportion of intervals containing the population parameter for each sample and a running total of all the samples. Users can also click on a particular interval to display the numerical interval or sort the displayed confidence intervals from smallest to largest. This applet is part of a collection designed to accompany the textbook "Investigating Statistical Concepts, Applications, and Methods" (ISCAM) and is used in Exploration 4.3 on page 327, Investigation 4.3.6 on page 331, and Exploration 4.4 on page 350. This applet also supplements "Workshop Statistics: Discovery with Data," 2nd edition, Activity 19-5 on page 403. Additional materials written for use with these applets can be found at http://www.mathspace.com/NSF_ProbStat/Teaching_Materials/rowell/final/16_cireview_bc322_2.doc and http://www.mathspace.com/NSF_ProbStat/Teaching_Materials/rowell/final/15_sampdistreview_bc322_1.doc.
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  • A cartoon to teach about ambiguous reporting of survey information. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • The words 'model' and 'mode' have, indeed, the same root; today, model building is science a la mode. Quote of american philosopher Abraham Kaplan (1918-1993) appearing in "The Conduct of Inquiry" (Chandler, 1964) p. 258. Also to be found in "Statistically Speaking the dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither p. 140
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  • Chance is only the measure of our ignorance. A quote from French mathematician and physicist Jules Henri Poincare (1854 - 1912) found in "The Foundations of Science", page 395, The Science Press, 1913. The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.
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  • ... we must remember that measures were made for man and not man for measures. a quote of popular science and science fiction author Isaac Asimov (1920 - 1992) in "Of Time and Space and Other Things" page 143, Avon Books, 1965. The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.
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  • That was why statistics had to be invented - because people were so unstable and irrational, taken one at a time. A quote of American science fiction author Raymond F. Jones (1915 - 1994) found in his 1956 short story "The Non-Statistical Man". The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.
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  • This text article gives a relatively short description of the concept of p-values and statistical significance. This article aimed at health professionals frames the idea of statistical significance in the setting of a weight loss program. In addition to discussing p-values and comparing them with confidence intervals, the article touches on the ideas of practical significance and the fact that the significance of 0.05 is arbitrary.
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  • The Numbers Guy examines numbers in the news, business and politics. Some numbers are flat-out wrong or biased, while others are valid and help us make informed decisions. Carl Bialik tells the stories behind the stats, in daily updates on this blog and in his column published every other Friday in The Wall Street Journal.
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  • This lecture example discusses calculating chance with probabilities (a ratio of occurrence to the whole) or odds (a ratio of occurrence to nonoccurrence). It presents a clinical example of measuring the chance of initiating breastfeeding among 1000 new mothers. Tables are provided in pdf format.
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