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  • A joke to use when teaching about choices of binary response data models like the Logistic or Probit models by University of Texas at El Paso professor of Mathematical Sciences, Lawrence Mark Lesser (1964-).
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  • A joke that can be used when teaching six sigma process control ideas or chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests.
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  • The song may be used to teach the importance of a good graphical display in presenting statistical data. May be sung to the tune of "Hit Me With Your Best Shot" (Eddie Schwartz, Pat Benatar, 1980). An earlier version appeared in Spring 2011 issue of Teaching Statistics. Lyrics by Lawrence Lesser, University of Texas at El Paso. version here introduced at the 2013 U.S. Conference On Teaching Statistics.
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  • Although numbers don't lie, it's rather annoying that they don't tell us everything we need to know. Maybe it's because 99% of all statistics only tell us 49% of the story. is a quote by American investment author Ron DeLegge II (1971 - ). The quote appears in his book "Gents With No Cents" published in 2011 by Half Full Publishing Group.
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  • If you think that statistics has nothing to say about what you do or how you could do it better, then you are either wrong or in need of a more interesting job. is a quote by Swiss Statistician Professor Stephen John Senn (1953 - ). The quote is from his 2003 book "Dicing with Death: Chance, Risk, and Health" published by Cambridge University Press.
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  • A cartoon for use in teaching about the Normal distribution. The cartoon was drawn by Australian epidemiologist Matthew Freeman of the Public Health Information Development Unit at the University of Adelaide. It is free for use on course websites or in the classroom provided author acknowledgement is given (e.g. leave copyright statement on the image). Commercial uses should contact the copyright holder. The cartoon was also published under the title "A visual comparison of normal and paranormal distributions" in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (2006) 60(1):6
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  • A song to teach the idea the difference between the population and sample correlation. The lyrics are by Lawrence M Lesser, University of Texas at El Paso in collaboration with Dennis K Pearl, The Ohio State University. The song may be sung to the tune of the children's folk song "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" and like that song may be sung in rounds. Dr. Lesser sings the song in an accompanying MP3 audio file.
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  • A fun song about the average by American humorist and singer-songwriter Carla Ulbrich. The song is also available at www.theacousticguitarproject.com/artist/carla-ulbrich/ and more about the singer can be found at her website at www.carlau.com. For classroom use, you might ask which lines in "Totally Average Woman" refer to ways in which the woman in the song is at the mean, and which refer to ways in which she is at the median. Permission from singer is for free use for teaching in classroom and course websites with attribution. Commercial users must contact the copyright holder.
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  • A song to teach about the relationship between the slope of the regression line and the correlation. The lyric was authored by Lawrence Mark Lesser from the University of Texas at El Paso. The song may be sung to the tune of the English lullaby "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" (Jane Taylor, 1806). Free for use in non-commercial teaching.
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  • This simulation allows you to roll two dice and compare empirical and probability histograms for the sum or product of the two outcomes.
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