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  • In this free online video program, "students will learn to derive and interpret the correlation coefficient using the relationship between a baseball player's salary and his home run statistics." The students will then "discover how to use the square of the correlation coefficient to measure the strength and direction of a relationship between two variables. A study comparing identical twins raised together and apart illustrates the concept of correlation."
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  • In this free online program, "students will see how the computer can graph multivariate data and various ways of presenting it. The program concludes with an example of a study of environmental stresses in the Chesapeake Bay." This individual video is accessed by scrolling down to the "Individual Program Descriptions - 10. Multidimensional Data Analysis" and click the "VOD" icon at the top-right of the description.
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  • In this free online video program, students will learn that "causation is only one of many possible explanations for an observed association. This program defines the concepts of common response and confounding, explains the use of two-way tables of percents to calculate marginal distribution, uses a segmented bar to show how to visually compare sets of conditional distributions, and presents a case of Simpson's Paradox. The relationship between smoking and lung cancer provides a clear example."
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  • In this free online video program, students will learn that "statistics can be used to evaluate anecdotal evidence. This program distinguishes between observational studies and experiments and reviews basic principles of design including comparison, randomization, and replication. Case material from the Physician's Health Study on heart disease demonstrates the advantages of a double-blind experiment."
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  • A collection of links to video workshops for students in mathematics. Includes many topics from statistics to math and science to algebra.
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  • A good resource for problems in statistics in engineering. Contains some applets, and good textual examples related to engineering. Some topics include Monte Carlo method, Central Limit Theorem, Risk, Logistic Regression, Generalized Linear .Models, and Confidence.
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  • This page of Statistical Java describes 11 different probability distributions including the Binomial, Poisson, Negative Binomial, Geometric, T, Chi-squared, Gamma, Weibull, Log-Normal, Beta, and F. Each distribution has its own applet in which users can manipulate the parameters to see how the distribution changes. The parameters are described on the main page as well as situations that would use each distribution. The equations of the distributions are not given. To select between the different applets you can click on Statistical Theory, Probability Distributions and then the Main Page. At the bottom of this page you can make your applet selection. This page was formerly located at http://www.stat.vt.edu/~sundar/java/applets/
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  • This site contains materials to help teach a Chance course. It includes a newsletter, videos and audios, teaching aids, and other related Internet sources.
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  • The Against All Odds video series provides an extensive introduction to statistics. It consists of 26 half hour video episodes that include lecturing on statistical topics, animations of statistical topics and video of real world examples. The series is available online or can be purchased on VHS video tape. The statistical material in the series was supervised by Dr. David Moore and accordingly much of the material echos the language used in Moore's textbooks. Topics covered include most topics from an introductory statistics course and slightly more advanced topics such as seasonal variation, blocking of experimental designs and even Chernof faces. The material is very well suited for students in undergraduate statistics classes.
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