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  • This tutorial exposes students to conducting t-tests in SPSS. This html based tutorial provides extensive screen shots and two example data sets. Topics covered in the tutorial include one sample, paired and independent samples t-tests and conducting transformations (such as a difference) of the data.

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  • This applet simulates drawing samples from a binomial distribution. Users set the population proportion of success (pi), sample size (n), and number of samples. By clicking "Draw Samples," the applet will draw a sample and display the corresponding sample histogram. Each new sample drawn is added to the previous ones unless the user clicks "Reset" between samples. Users can choose to display the number and proportion of successes above or below a certain value (tail probabilities) by entering a value in the "Num Successes" box and clicking "Count." The portion of the distribution that meets the condition is highlighted in red, and the proportion of success is given at the bottom of the page. Clicking the inequality sign changes its direction. Clicking "Theo Values" displays the theoretical distribution in green on top of the empirical. Instructions and an activity for this applet can be found in the textbook "Investigating Statistical Concepts, Applications, and Methods" (ISCAM) in Lesson 3.2.2 on page 205.

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  • Everyday we have specific routines we engage in. Many of these routines are tailored to preventing us from becoming victims of crime. We do things like lock our doors, watch where we walk at night, or avoid walking alone. We take these actions because at some level we are afraid of the possibility of being a victim of crime. Although we may not consciously think about it, these routines may be influenced by a variety of factors. What factors might make some individuals more afraid than others?

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  • This online calculator allows users to enter 16 observations with up to 4 dependent variables and calculates the regression equation, the fitted values, R-Squared, the F-Statistic, mean, variance, first order serial-correlation, second order serial-correlation, the Durbin-Watson statistic, and the mean absolute errors. It also tests normality and gives the i-th residuals.

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  • This random number service allows users to generate up to 10,000 random integers with duplicates, randomized sequences without duplicates, or up to 16 kilobytes of raw random bytes. Users can also flip virtual coins and generate random bitmaps. Key word: Random Number Generator.

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  • This calculator computes the chi-square statistic, degrees of freedom (DoF), and p-value for the Chi-square test for equality of distributions. Users input a table of values with row and column labels without total scores. The null hypothesis is that the all the samples have the same distribution.

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  • This test checks whether an observed distribution differs from an expected distribution. It computes the chi-square statistic, degrees of freedom (DoF), and p-value. Users input a table with row and column labels, observed frequencies on the first row, and expected frequencies on the second row. The null hypothesis is that the observed values have the expected frequency distribution.

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  • Compared to probability calculators, the traditional format of distribution tables has the advantage of showing many values simultaneously and, thus, enables the user to examine and quickly explore ranges of probabilities. This webpage includes a list of distributions and tables, including the standard normal (Z) table, student's t table, chi-square table, and F distribution tables. An animation of the density function and distribution function is shown above each distribution table to demonstrate the effects changing degrees of freedom and significance levels have on the shape of a distribution.

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  • March 24, 2009 Activity webinar presented by Nicholas Horton, Smith College, and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Otterbein College. Students have a hard time making the connection between variance and risk. To convey the connection, Foster and Stine (Being Warren Buffett: A Classroom Simulation of Risk and Wealth when Investing in the Stock Market; The American Statistician, 2006, 60:53-60) developed a classroom simulation. In the simulation, groups of students roll three colored dice that determine the success of three "investments". The simulated investments behave quite differently. The value of one remains almost constant, another drifts slowly upward, and the third climbs to extremes or plummets. As the simulation proceeds, some groups have great success with this last investment--they become the "Warren Buffetts" of the class. For most groups, however, this last investment leads to ruin because of variance in its returns. The marked difference in outcomes shows students how hard it is to separate luck from skill. The simulation also demonstrates how portfolios, weighted combinations of investments, reduce the variance. In the simulation, a mixture of two poor investments is surprisingly good. In this webinar, the activity is demonstrated along with a discussion of goals, context, background materials, class handouts, and references (extra materials available for download free of charge)

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  • The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource is a collection of data sets. It includes definitions of each variable in the data set. It requires a login to retrieve the data sets. Registering involves giving your name and address and the name of the study and a detailed description of the intended use of the data.
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