Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Resource Library

Statistical Topic

Advanced Search | Displaying 51 - 60 of 531
  • January 26, 2010 webinar presented by Alicia Gram, Smith College, and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. This webinar describes an activity that uses data collected from an experiment looking at the relationship between two categorical variables: whether a cotton plant was exposed to spider mites; and did the plant contract Wilt disease? The activity uses randomization to explore whether there is a difference between the occurrence of the disease with and without the mites. The webinar includes a discussion of the learning goals of the activity, followed by an implementation of the activity then suggestions for assessment. The implementation first uses a physical simulation, then a simulation using technology. (Extra materials, including Fathom instructions for the simulation, available for download free of charge).

    0
    No votes yet
  • A game to aid in teaching experimental design and significance testing (especially one sample, two sample, and matched pair situations). Tangrams are puzzles in which a person is expected to place geometrically shaped pieces into a particular design. The on-line Tangram Game provides students the opportunity to design many versions of the original game in order to test which variables have the largest effect on game completion time. A full set of student and instructor materials are available and were created by Kevin Comiskey (West Point), Rod Sturdivant (Ohio State University) and Shonda Kuiper (Grinnell College) as part of the Stat2Labs collection.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This is my take on the ubiquitous M&Ms counting activity. Each student records the color proportions in a fun-size bag of M&Ms. We pool the class data and run a Chi-Square goodness-of-fit test to determine whether or not the color proportions match those claimed on the manufacturer's website. We consistently find that the proportions do not match. The blue M&Ms, in particular, are underrepresented. This activity also includes a review of the 1-proportion z confidence interval.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This activity uses student's own data to introduce bivariate relationship using hand size to predict height. Students enter their data through a real-time online database. Data from different classes are stored and accumulated in the database. This real-time database approach speeds up the data gathering process and shifts the data entry and cleansing from instructor to engaging students in the process of data production.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This program has been written to explore the relationship between the data points and the error surface of the regression problem. On one hand you can learn how to represent a line in two different spaces ({x,y} and {k,d}), and on the other hand you see that solving the regression problem is nothing else than finding the minimum in the error surface.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This program visualizes the effects of outliers to regression lines. The user may pick up a point with the mouse and move it across the chart. The resulting regression line is automatically adjusted after each movement, showing the effect in an immediate and impressive way. The program Leverage allows one to experiment with the leverage effect. You can create a random sample of data noisy points on a line. Dragging one of the points away from the regression line immediately shows the effect, as the regression line is recalculated and moves according to the current data set. Not online: user has to download the program.

    0
    No votes yet
  • How can we accurately model the unpredictable world around us? How can we reason precisely about randomness? This course will guide you through the most important and enjoyable ideas in probability to help you cultivate a more quantitative worldview.

    By the end of this course, you’ll master the fundamentals of probability and random variables, and you’ll apply them to a wide array of problems, from games and sports to economics and science.  This course includes 62 interactive quizzes and more than 400 probabilty-based problems with solutions.  Access to this course requires users to sign up for a free account.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Probability is a 2 minute 14 second video that can be used in discussing the probability of rare events (e.g. how many consecutive times must a coin land heads before you question whether it is a fair coin?). The video was written, shot, and edited by Sam Rapien in 2007. The music is by Brett Musil and Sam Rapien and the single cast member is Jon Anderson. Mr. Rapien made this video while a graduate student in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Visual ANOVA is a simple little program that lets you put all this theory we've been describing into a simple visual whole. It assumes that you've read the Meanings and Intuitions section and have have understood the the general ideas at least. Even if your understanding of the previous section is incomplete at this time, it is worth playing with Visual ANOVA since that may clear up the big picture of ANOVA for you.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This article describes an activity that illustrates contingency table (two-way table) analysis. Students use contingency tables to analyze the "unusual episode" (the sinking of the ocean liner Titanic)data (from Dawson 1995) and attempt to use their analysis to deduce the origin of the data. The activity is appropriate for use in an introductory college statistics course or in a high school AP statistics course. Key words: contingency table (two-way table), conditional distribution

    0
    No votes yet

Pages