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  • October 9, 2007 Teaching & Learning webinar presented by Norean Sharpe, Babson College, and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. Writing can be a wonderful tool to help illuminate what students are learning in our statistics courses. Examples and strategies to include writing in your teaching toolkit -- and to increase the writing skills of students -- include team assignments, weekly case reports, in-class questions, and others. This webinar shares effective approaches and assignments gleaned from twenty years of experience using writing in introductory and upper-level statistics courses.
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  • November 13, 2007 Teaching and Learning webinar presented by Michael Rodriguez and Andrew Zieffler, University of Minnesota, ad hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. This webinar includes an introduction to the idea of assessment for learning - assessments that support learning, enhance learning, and provides additional learning opportunities that support instruction. Several fundamental measurement tools are described to support the development of effective assessments that work.
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  • February 12, 2008 Teaching and Learning webinar presented by Christopher J. Malone, Winona State University and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. The procedural steps involved in completing a statistical investigation are often discussed in an introductory statistics course. For example, students usually gain knowledge about developing an appropriate research question, performing appropriate descriptive and graphical summaries, completing the necessary inferential procedures, and communicating the results of such an analysis. The traditional sequencing of topics in an introductory course places statistical inference near the end. As a result, students have limited opportunities to perform a complete statistical investigation. In this webinar, Dr. Malone proposes a new sequencing of topics that may enhance students' ability to perform a complete statistical investigation from beginning to end.
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  • March 11, 2008 Teaching and Learning webinar presented by Deborah Nolan, University of California at Berkeley and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. Computing is an increasingly important element of statistical practice and research. It is an essential tool in our daily work, it shapes the way we think about statistics, and broadens our concept of statistical science. Although many agree that there should be more computing in the statistics curriculum and that statistics students need to be more computationally capable and literate, it can be difficult to determine how the curriculum should change because computing has many dimensions. In this webinar Dr. Nolan explores alternatives to teaching statistics that include innovations in data technologies, modern statistical methods, and a variety of computing skills that will enable our students to become active and engaged participants in scientific discovery.
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  • Webinar recorded May 9, 2006 presented by Carl Lee of Central Michigan University and hosted by Jackie Miller of The Ohio State University. Do you use hands-on activities in your class? Would you be interested in using data collected by students from different classes at different institutions? Would you be interested in sharing your students' data with others? Does it take more time than you would like to spend in your class for hands-on activities? Do you have to enter the hands-on activity data yourself after the class period? If your answer to any of the above questions is "YES", then, this Real-Time Online Database approach should be beneficial to your class. In this presentation, Dr. Lee (1) introduces the real-time online database (stat.cst.cmich.edu/statact) funded by a NSF/CCL grant, (2) demonstrates how to use the real-time database to teach introductory statistics using two of the real-time activities and (3) shares with you some of the assessment activities including activity work sheets and projects.
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  • A joke about the tendency for Math and Statistics textbooks to have an abundance of homework style problems.
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  • Song about the benefits of the Bayesian approach to statistics. May be sung to the tune of Sonny and Cher's 1965 song "I Got You Babe." Lyrics by Matthew Finkelman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization by Joshua Lintz male vocals by Joshua Lintz and female vocals by Marianna Sandoval from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • Song covering a variety of statistical topics. May be sung to the tune of John Lennon's 1969 song "Give Peace a Chance." Lyrics by Armin Schwartzman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • Song about the pleasure of teaching statistics when the class is engaged. May be sung to the tune of John Lennon and Paul McCartney's 1963 song "I Want to Hold Your Hand." Lyrics by Armin Schwartzman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • Song about the need to show a significant result in order to have a manuscript published. May be sung to the tune of Robert Feldman, Gerald Goldstein and Richard Gottehrer's 1963 song "My Boyfriend's Back," popularized by The Angels. Lyrics by Marc Coram and Matthew Finkelman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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