Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Resource Library

Advanced Search | Displaying 41 - 50 of 833
  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching the difference between how the word random is used in probability compared to some uses in everyday parlance. The cartoon is number 1210 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license

    3
    Average: 3 (1 vote)
  • This activity uses student's own data to introduce bivariate relationship using hand size to predict height. Students enter their data through a real-time online database. Data from different classes are stored and accumulated in the database. This real-time database approach speeds up the data gathering process and shifts the data entry and cleansing from instructor to engaging students in the process of data production.

    0
    No votes yet
  • an old "walks into a bar" joke with a statistics twist.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Statistic Acrostic is a poem by statistics educator Lawrence Mark Lesser and biostatistician Dennis K. Pearl that covers several statistical concepts using only 26 words (one starting with each letter of the alphabet).

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon for use in discussing the issues of causation versus correlation and the assumptions underlying Structural Equations Modeling (SEM) for students who have been introduced to that technique. The idea for the cartoon came from David Lane of Rice University and the cartoon was drawn by Ben Shabad, a student at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. The cartoon was awarded a tie for first place in the cartoon category of the 2011 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. For for use in statistics courses at non-profit institutions.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon about the perception that statistics exams are difficult. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This program has been written to explore the relationship between the data points and the error surface of the regression problem. On one hand you can learn how to represent a line in two different spaces ({x,y} and {k,d}), and on the other hand you see that solving the regression problem is nothing else than finding the minimum in the error surface.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This program visualizes the effects of outliers to regression lines. The user may pick up a point with the mouse and move it across the chart. The resulting regression line is automatically adjusted after each movement, showing the effect in an immediate and impressive way. The program Leverage allows one to experiment with the leverage effect. You can create a random sample of data noisy points on a line. Dragging one of the points away from the regression line immediately shows the effect, as the regression line is recalculated and moves according to the current data set. Not online: user has to download the program.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This Haiku was written by Dr. Nyaradzo Mvududu of the Seattle Pacific University School of Education. The poem took first place in the 2007 A-Mu-sing competition.

    0
    No votes yet
  • JChart2D is a minimalistic charting library published under the OSI approved GNU LESSER GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE. It is designed for displaying multiple traces consisting of tracepoints. JChart2D is centered around a single configurable swing widget: the Chart2D. It is a JComponent that one can add to a java swing user interface. Therefore basic knowledge of java awt and swing and the information provided on this site is helpful. JChart2D is intended for engineering tasks and not for presentations. It's specialty is run time - dynamic precise display of data with a minimal configuration overhead.

    0
    No votes yet

Pages