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  • A song for use in discussing some key features of a good bar graph representing categorical data (y-axis starting at zero and the areas of bars proportional to the amount of data).  The lyrics are by Lawrence M. Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and may be sung to the tune of the 1908 classic "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" by Jack Norworth and Albert Von Tilzer.

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  • A song about the work of British nursing pioneer and statistician Florence Nightingale (1820 - 1910) that may be used in discussing the idea that important statistical methods generally arise from important real problems. The lyrics were written in 2017 by Lawrence Mark Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and may be sung to the tune of Julie Gold's Grammy-winning song "From a Distance." The song was published in the May 2017 online issue of Amstat News (see http://magazine.amstat.org/blog/2017/05/18/florence-astatistics-song/) and, with accompanying historical and educational links, in the summer 2017 newsletter of the Teaching Statistics in the Health Sciences section of the American Statistical Association.

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  • A song that may be used in discussing how to make and interpret box plots.  The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the Irish folk song Michael Finnegan.

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  • Song about the use of the logarithmic transformation in statistics. May be sung to the tune of "Hound Dog" which was popularized by Elvis Presley. Lyrics written by Dennis Pearl with assistance from Deb Rumsey. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • A joke to help in recalling the purpose of Correlation and Regression. The joke was written in 2017 by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.
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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the selection of the best explanatory variable in a regression model. The cartoon was used in the March 2017 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. The winning caption was submitted by Michael Posner, from Villanova University. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. A second winning entry, by Michele Balik-Meisner, a student at North Carolina State University, may be found at www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/variable-wheel-i Three honorable mentions that rose to the top of the judging in the March competition included “No no no! You randomize AFTER you select your research topic!” by Mickey Dunlap from University of Georgia; “This isn't what I meant by random variable!” by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso; and “We find this method of finding 'significant' predictors to be quicker than using stepwise regression and it is even slightly more reproducible.” by Greg Snow from Brigham Young University.
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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the selection of the best explanatory variable in a regression model. The cartoon was used in the March 2017 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. The winning caption was submitted by Michele Balik-Meisner, a student at North Carolina State University. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. A second winning entry, by Michael Posner of Villanova University, may be found at www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/variable-wheel-ii Three honorable mentions that rose to the top of the judging in the March competition included “No no no! You randomize AFTER you select your research topic!” by Mickey Dunlap from University of Georgia; “This isn't what I meant by random variable!” by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso; and “We find this method of finding 'significant' predictors to be quicker than using stepwise regression and it is even slightly more reproducible.” by Greg Snow from Brigham Young University.
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  • A joke that might be used in a discussion of the problem of using a simple linear regression to extrapolate beyond the range of the data (where it is unlikely that the linear relationship would continue to hold). The joke was written by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.
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  • This tutorial on SQL teaches the most used commands. There is a short explanation, then the user is asked a simple question. If the typed answer is correct, the user continues to the next lesson.
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  • A cartoon to aid in the discussion of the difference between descriptive and inferential statistics. The cartoon was created by Greg Crowther from Everett Community College and took second place in the cartoon category of the 2017 A-mu-sing competition.
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