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  • A game to aid in teaching experimental design and significance testing (especially one sample, two sample, and matched pair situations). Tangrams are puzzles in which a person is expected to place geometrically shaped pieces into a particular design. The on-line Tangram Game provides students the opportunity to design many versions of the original game in order to test which variables have the largest effect on game completion time. A full set of student and instructor materials are available and were created by Kevin Comiskey (West Point), Rod Sturdivant (Ohio State University) and Shonda Kuiper (Grinnell College) as part of the Stat2Labs collection.
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  • Rseek.org is a search engine for R resources. Type any topic in the search box, and get resources that are R specific. You can further narrow your search to just articles, books, packages, support, or "for beginners."
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  • A song about the different assumptions needed for parametric statistical methods and the importance of checking how well they hold and what effect they may have on the results and conclusions. The lyrics were written in 2017 by Dennis K. Pearl from Penn State University and may be sung to the tune of "Every Breath You Take" written by Sting and made popular by The Police on their 1983 album "Synchronicity."
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  • A quote to be used in discussing how sufficient data should be able to trump an hypothesis. The quote is by English philosopher and pioneering feminist Mary Wollstonecraft (1759 – 1797) from her 1792 book "A Vindication of the Rights of Woman." .
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  • A quote that might be used in discussing the research cycle where data is gathered in order to reduce uncertainty, which in turn leads to refinement of models and a new quest to reduce remaining uncertainty. The quote is by American educator and classicist Edith Hamilton (1867 – 1963) from her book Spokesmen for God (1949). The quote may also be found at www.quotationsbywomen.com.
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  • A quote to aid in discussing drawing meaning out of data and the ethical presentation of results. The quote is from Susan Etlinger (1962 - ) an industry analyst for the Altimeter Group from her September 2014 TED talk.
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  • A quote to aid in a discussion of drawing out the salient features of data in plots and statistics. The quote is by small business and organization expert Stephanie Winston from her book The Organized Executive: A Program for Productivity--New Ways to Manage Time, Paper, People, and the Digital Office (1994)
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  • A quote to help in discussing over-interpretation of the results of an analysis (e.g. improper extrapolation, unwarranted conclusions that don't match the design of the study, neglecting the true variability in the data, etc.). The quote is by American nonfiction author and science reporter for the New York Times Natalie Angier (1958 - ). The quote is from her book: The Canon: A Whirligig Tour of the Beautiful Basics of Science (2007). The quote may also be found at www.quotationsbywomen.com. In context, the quote reads: "The power of science lies in its willingness to attack a big problem by dividing it into many small pieces, its embrace of the unfairly maligned practice known as reductionism. At the same time, the piecemeal approach demands that scientists be circumspect to an often tedious degree and that they resist – no matter how much they are pushed by their university’s public relations department or by desperate journalists – making more of the data than the data make of themselves."
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  • A cartoon to be used in discussing the properties and caveats of ANOVA. The cartoon is #905 in the web comic Piled Higher and Deeper by Panamanian cartoonist Jorge Cham (1976- ): see www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=905. Free for use in classrooms and course websites with acknowledgement (i.e. "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham, www.phdcomics.com)
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  • A cartoon suitable for use in discussing the interpretation of p-values of different levels. The cartoon is number 1478 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.
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