Software

  • This online software allows you to load data and make professional-looking graphs with it. Graph types are basic (scatterplot, line plot, bar charts, etc.), statistical (histograms, box plots), scientific (error bars, heat map, contour), 3D charts, and financial (e.g. time series). Other graphs are available with the paid pro version. Log in is required, which allows you to upload data and save it for next use.
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  • This online application allows the user to import data from online resources such as Facebook, Google Analytics, GitHub, as well as spreadsheets on their own computers. They can then drag-and-drop variables to make graphs automatically. The basic version is free, but you can upgrade to a paid version which allows combining data across services and, if the data come from an online resource, the user has the choice to have Data Hub keep the graphs updated as the data changes.
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  • This software makes it easier to use the R language. It includes a code debugger, editing, and visualization tools.
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  • This is a web application framework for R, in which you can write and publish web apps without knowing HTML, Java, etc. You create two .R files: one that controls the user interface, and one that controls what the app does. The site contains examples of Shiny apps, a tutorial on how to get started, and information on how to have your apps hosted, if you don't have a server.
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  • This software allows you to extract data from published graphs. There is a web-based app and a downloadable version. First, you provide the software with a picture of the graph in question. Then you give it two points on the x-axis and two points on the y-axis for reference. Then you click on the points on the graph that you want to extract. The points are put into a .csv file.
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  • A joke that can be used when teaching six sigma process control ideas or chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests.
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  • A cartoon for use in discussing Uniformly Most Powerful Tests. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • Rejection Detection is a poem by Patricia McCann of Franklin University. It may be used in teaching about p-values in hypothesis testing.
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  • A song to teach various concepts in probability. Written by Mary Pat Campbell for Mathcamp 2002 at Colorado College. May be sung to the tune of "Take a Chance on Me" by ABBA. Musical accompaniment realization by Joshua Lintz and vocals by Mariana Sandoval from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • Statistics are the food of love. A quote by American editor and author Roger Angell from his 1982 book "Late Innings: a Baseball Companion", published by Simon & Schuster. Also to be found in "Statistically Speaking the dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither p. 213
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