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Simulation

  • A video to teach about principles of Analysis of Variance. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 1984 song "Hallelujah" by Canadian songwriter Leonard Cohen. The video took third place in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
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  • A video to dispel myths about Statistics and excite students early in a course. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 2000 song "Where Are You, Christmas? " written by James Horner and Will Jennings for the movie "How the Grinch Stole Christmas". The video received an honorable mention in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
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  • This simulation illustrates least squares regression and how the least squares solution minimizes the sum of the squared residuals. The applet demonstrates, in a visual manner, various concepts related to least squares regression. These include residuals, sum of squares, the mean line, how the line of best fit is determined, and how the line of least squares solution minimizes the sum of the squared residuals.

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  • StatKey is the analysis package to accompany the textbook "Statistics: Unlocking the Power of Data." StatKey includes interactive applets to describe and graph data, engage in bootstrapping and randomization tests, and explore sampling distributions and theoretical distributions.

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  • The WISE Bootstrapping Applet can be used to demonstrate bootstrapping by creating a confidence interval for a population mean or median. The user can manipulate the population distribution, sample size, and number of resamples. An associated guide gives suggestions for teaching bootstrapping.
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  • A song to teach the idea the difference between the population and sample correlation. The lyrics are by Lawrence M Lesser, University of Texas at El Paso in collaboration with Dennis K Pearl, The Ohio State University. The song may be sung to the tune of the children's folk song "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" and like that song may be sung in rounds. Dr. Lesser sings the song in an accompanying MP3 audio file.
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  • A fun song about the average by American humorist and singer-songwriter Carla Ulbrich. The song was a finalist in the novelty category of the 2018 USA Songwriting Competition.  The song is also available at www.theacousticguitarproject.com/artist/carla-ulbrich/ and more about the singer can be found at her website at www.carlau.com. For classroom use, you might ask which lines in "Totally Average Woman" refer to ways in which the woman in the song is at the mean, and which refer to ways in which she is at the median. Permission from singer is for free use for teaching in classroom and course websites with attribution. Commercial users must contact the copyright holder.

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  • A song to teach about the relationship between the slope of the regression line and the correlation. The lyric was authored by Lawrence Mark Lesser from the University of Texas at El Paso. The song may be sung to the tune of the English lullaby "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" (Jane Taylor, 1806). Free for use in non-commercial teaching. This song is also part of an NSF-funded library of interactive songs that involved students creating responses to prompts that are then included in the lyrics (see www.causeweb.org/smiles for the interactive version of the song, a short reading covering the topic, and an assessment item).

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  • A song to teach about when the mean versus the median is better for describing a distribution. The lyric was authored by Lawrence Mark Lesser from the University of Texas at El Paso. The song may be sung to the tune of Taylor Swift's Grammy winning 2010 hit "Mean". Free for use in non-commercial teaching.
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  • A song that reviews several statistical topics written by University of Texas at El Paso professor Lawrence M. Lesser. The song is a parody of "We Are the Champions" written by Freddy Mercury that was popularized by the British rock group Queen in their 1977 Album "ewe of the World."
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