Literature Index

Displaying 101 - 110 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Whittinghill, D. C. & Hogg, R. V.
    Year:
    2001
    Abstract:
    We explore the varied uses of the uniform distribution on [theta - 1/2, theta + 1/2] as an example in the undergraduate probability and statistics sequence or the mathematical statistics course. Like its cousin, the uniform distribution on [0, theta], this density provides tractable examples from the topic of order statistics to hypothesis tests. Unlike its cousin, which appears in many probability and statistics books, this uniform is less well known or used. We discuss maximum likelihood estimators, likelihood ratio tests, confidence intervals, joint distributions of order statistics, use of Mathematica®, sufficiency, and other advanced topics. Finally, we suggest a few exercises deriving likelihood ratio tests when the range is unknown as well, or for the uniform on [theta - rho, theta + rho].
  • Author(s):
    Zieffler, A. S.
    Editors:
    Garfield, J. B.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    This study examined students' development of reasoning about quantitative bivariate data during a one-semester university-level introductory statistics course. There were three research questions of interest: (1) What is the nature, or pattern of change in students' development in reasoning about vbivariate data?; (2) Is the sequencing of bivariate data within a course associated with changes in the pattern of change in students' reasoning about bivariate data?; and (3) Are changes in students' reasoning about the foundational concepts of distribution associated with changes in the pattern of change in students' reasoning about bivariate data?
  • Author(s):
    Green, D. R.
    Editors:
    Vere-Jones, D., Carlyle, S., & Dawkins, B. P.
    Year:
    1991
    Abstract:
    This paper reports on one of the "Randomness" questions and on a set of ten "Comparison of Odds" questions, all of which were common to both studies, and for which results have not hitherto been published.
  • Author(s):
    Lehman, D. R., & Nisbett, R. E.
    Editors:
    Nisbett, R. E.
    Year:
    1993
    Abstract:
    Does an undergraduate education improve reasoning about everyday-life problems? Do some forms of undergraduate training enhance certain types of reasoning more than others? These issues have not been addressed in a methodologically rigorous manner (Nickerson, Perkins, & Smith, 1985). We consequently have little knowledge of whether reasoning can be improved by instruction, yet this question has long been regarded as central the theories of cognitive development.
  • Author(s):
    Becker, B. J.
    Year:
    1996
    Abstract:
    Statistics instructors and others interested in the teaching of statistics will find many print and nonprint resources on this topic. The print literature on the teaching of statistics is largely anecdotal and comprises mainly recommendations for instruction based on the experiences and intuitions of individual instructors. Less than 30% of the print literature reports the results of empirical studies, but these cover a broad range of topics, including the use of computers in statistics education, teaching materials, and teaching strategies. A large portion of the nonempirical literature is devoted to descriptions of statistics courses and specific lessons that, though untested, still provide a resource for instruction. Recently numerous nonprint (electronic) resources for instruction, problem solving, and discussions about statistics instruction have also become available. These include many data sets and other instructional resources, statistics discussion groups, and the electronic Journal of Statistics Education.
  • Author(s):
    Caterina Primi, Maria Anna Donati, and Francesca Chiesi
    Year:
    2016
    Abstract:
    Among the wide range of factors related to the acquisition of statistical knowledge, competence in basic mathematics, including basic probability, has received much attention. In this study, a mediation model was estimated to derive the total, direct, and indirect effects of mathematical competence on statistics achievement taking into account probabilistic reasoning ability. The participants were psychology students enrolled in an undergraduate introductory statistics course. At the beginning of the course, all students completed a questionnaire to measure their proficiency in the basic probabilistic reasoning and mathematics skills required in introductory statistics courses. At the end of the course, the students’ final grades were collected. The hypothesized mediation model was tested using a bootstrapping procedure (with 5000 bootstrap samples). Results showed a significant positive, indirect effect of mathematical competence on students’ final grades, with probabilistic reasoning ability acting as a mediator. This study suggests that interventions designed to promote the mathematical prerequisites necessary to probabilistic reasoning can have a positive effect on achievement in statistics.
  • Author(s):
    Sema A. Kalaian and Rafa M. Kasim
    Year:
    2013
    Abstract:
    This meta-analytic study focused on the quantitative integration and synthesis of the accumulated pedagogical research in undergraduate statistics education literature. These accumulated research studies compared the academic achievement of students who had been instructed using one of the various forms of small-group learning methods to those who had been instructed using lecture-based instruction. The meta-analytic results showed that cooperative, collaborative, and inquiry-based learning methods were used in college-level statistics courses. The results also showed that cooperative and collaborative learning methods supported the effectiveness of the small-group learning methods in improving students’ academic achievement with an overall average effect-size of 0.60. In contrast, the effectiveness of inquiry-based learning was close to zero. This significant positive average effect-size indicated that using small-group learning methods in statistics classrooms could increase the achievement of college students, increasing the scores on a statistics exam from the 50th to the 73rd percentile. In addition, the multilevel analysis revealed that the effect sizes were influenced significantly by the publication-year of the studies, with the most recently published studies having lower effect sizes. The major implication of this study is that evidence-based research supports the effectiveness of active small-group learning methods in promoting students’ achievement in statistics.
  • Author(s):
    Cohen, S., Chechile, R., Smith, G., Tsai, F., et al.
    Year:
    1994
    Abstract:
    Presents a method for evaluating educational software. The evaluation is designed as a field study, and is comprised of a test of remedial skills, an essay test of conceptual understanding, and a system that records how students use a given program. The instruments were used to evaluate ConStatS, a program for teaching conceptual understanding of probability and statistics. Ss were 327 undergraduates who used ConStatS and 63 control Ss who used tool-based statistics software but not ConStatS. Ss in the experimental group did better on 92 of the 103 questions than control Ss; the 10 questions on which the experimental group showed the greatest improvement over the control group involved transformations, probability, and the concepts of deviation and sensitivity of summary measures. (PsycLIT Database Copyright 1995 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)
  • Author(s):
    Batanero, M. C., & Godino, J. D.
    Year:
    1994
    Abstract:
    The students' interaction with the computer poses new problems of research in Mathematics Education and also offers new methodological resources. One of these is the possibility to employ the recording of the students' interaction with the computer as a technique to gather data on the processes that the students follow to solve the proposed tasks. In this work, different examples of the use of these records in research on Mathematics Education are analyzed, showing the diversity of the obtainable data and the dependence of the same with respect to the "roles" carried out by the computer and the student. We end by presenting the method of analysis of these records that we have used in our own research, that combines qualitative and quantitative elements and can be easily adapted to other research.
  • Author(s):
    Rogers, R. L.
    Year:
    1987
    Abstract:
    This article describes the use of a microcomputer software/textbook package which provides for individualized assignments in an introductory statistics course. Advantages and limitations of these materials are summarized and student reactions to them are reported. (Author/JDH)

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