Lecture Examples

  • This is a collection of cases to demonstrate concepts of inferential statistics. Many materials are flash based, which is specifically interesting for young and beginning learners. This resource provides a simple introduction to probability and to Type I and II errors.
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  • The two worksheets enable instructors to demonstrate how changes in the magnitude of the treatment effects and of the standard deviation of the error term will impact significance in a One-Way ANOVA model. The user specifies three input values that influence the simulation of random observations. ANOVA calculations are provided for the student, leaving the focus on the interpretation of the results. The mirror site (found at http://misnt.indstate.edu/cmclaren/ANOVA_Note.doc) contains an article that can serve as a teaching note to accompany the worksheets.
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  • Probability plotter and calculator allows students to explore different distributions and their relationships. Interactive dialogue box allows students to change distribution shape and scaling parameters as well as allowing to explore cumulative probabilities. Discrete distributions include the discrete uniform, binomial, and the poisson. Continuous distributions include the uniform, beta, exponential, weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions. Sampling distributions include the normal, the t-distribution, the chi-square, and the F-distribution.
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  • Amidst the strange vicissitudes of life, 'tis likely, most unlikely things should happen is a quote by Greek poet Agathon (448-400 BC). The quote is mentioned in Aristotle's (384 - 322 BC) book "Rhetoric". This version of the quote is found on page 357 of the 1823 "A New Translation of Aristotle's Rhetoric" by John Gillies.
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  • In this video (which lasts almost 20 minutes), statistics guru Hans Rosling debunks myths about the so-called "developing world."
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  • In this video (which lasts a little over 21 minutes), Oxford mathematician Peter Donnelly reveals the common mistakes humans make in interpreting statistics -- and the devastating impact these errors can have on the outcome of criminal trials.
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  • In this short 3 minute video, mathematician and magician Arthur Benjamin offers a bold proposal on how to make math education relevant in the digital age.
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  • In this 20 minute video, doctor and researcher Hans Rosling uses his fascinating data-bubble software to burst myths about the developing world. The video includes new analysis on China and the post-bailout world, mixed with classic data shows.
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  • An important idea in statistics is that the amount of data matters. We often teach this with formulas --- the standard error of the mean, the t-statistic, etc. --- in which the sample size appears in a denominator as √n. This is fine, so far as it goes, but it often fails to connect with a student's intuition. In this presentation, I'll describe a kinesthetic learning activity --- literally a random walk --- that helps drive home to students why more data is better and why the square-root arises naturally and can be understood by simple geometry. Students remember this activity and its lesson long after they have forgotten the formulas from their statistics class.
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  • August 25, 2009 Activity webinar presented by Michelle Everson, University of Minnesota and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. In a classroom setting, students can engage in hands-on activities in order to better understand certain concepts and ideas. Replicating hands-on activities in an online environment, however, can be a challenge for instructors. The purpose of this webinar is to present an applet that was created to replicate a "Post-it Note" activity commonly used in classroom sections of an undergraduate introductory statistics course at University of Minnesota. The Post-it Note activity is meant to help students develop a more conceptual understanding of the mean and the median by moving a set of Post-it Notes along a number line. During the webinar, participants have an opportunity to see and experience just how online students are able to interact with an applet named the "Sticky Centers" applet, and the webinar presents the kinds of materials and assignments that have been created to use in conjunction with this applet. The webinar ends with a preview of a newer applet that is being developed in order to replicate the famous "Gummy Bears in Space" activity (presented in Schaeffer, Gnanadesikan, Watkins & Witmer, 1996). A supplemental student handout is available for download free of charge.
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