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Fun

  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the value of stratification in reducing the variability of population estimates (and the difficulty in doing so when the population weights are unknown).. The cartoon was used in the May 2017 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. The winning caption was submitted by Jim Alloway of EMSQ Associates. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. Two honorable mentions that rose to the top of the judging in the May competition may be found at https://www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/product-testing-ii written by Larry Lesser from University of Texas at El Paso and at https://www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/product-testing-iii written by John Bailer from Miami University.
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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the affect on inference caused by subject-to-subject variability and how that relates to the differences between groups. The cartoon was used in the May 2017 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. This caption was submitted by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and took honorable mention in the contest. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. The winning caption in the May competition may be found at www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/product-testing-i (written by Jim Alloway of EMSQ Associates) and an honorable mention may be found at www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/product-testing-iii written by John Bailer from Miami University.
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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the advantages and disadvantages of random assignment when n is small and there are clear confounders (here the assignment might be to which product is tested first). The cartoon was used in the May 2017 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. This caption was written by John Bailer from Miami University and took honorable mention in the contest. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. The winning caption in the May competition may be found at www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/product-testing-i (written by Jim Alloway of EMSQ Associates) and an honorable mention may be found at www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/product-testing-ii written by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • A joke to help in recalling the purpose of Correlation and Regression. The joke was written in 2017 by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.
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  • A song about the work of British nursing pioneer and statistician Florence Nightingale (1820 - 1910) that may be used in discussing the idea that important statistical methods generally arise from important real problems. The lyrics were written in 2017 by Lawrence Mark Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and may be sung to the tune of Julie Gold's Grammy-winning song "From a Distance." The song was published in the May 2017 online issue of Amstat News (see http://magazine.amstat.org/blog/2017/05/18/florence-astatistics-song/) and, with accompanying historical and educational links, in the summer 2017 newsletter of the Teaching Statistics in the Health Sciences section of the American Statistical Association.

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  • A song to aid in the discussion of the meaning and interpretation of p-values and type I errors. The song's lyrics were written in 2017 by Lawrence Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and may be sung to the tune of the 1977 Bee Gees Grammy winning hit "Stayin' Alive."
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  • A poem to develop an understanding of permutations. A question like "Why is the word importunate used in a poem about a permutation?" will help the conversation. The poem was written by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso in 2017.
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  • A poem to illustrate the dependence between trials when sampling is without replacement. To set this poem up in the classroom, you might ask the students questions like: "If I want to put the Supreme Court Justices in a random order, I can pick one at a time without replacement. Before I pick the first Justice, do I know who it's going to be? Before I pick the last Justice, do I know who it's going to be?" The poem was written in 2017 by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • A video for use in teaching about the dangers of extrapolating well beyond the range of the data in linear regression. The lyrics and Powerpoint components of the video were written by Michael Posner while the vocals were done by Reena Freedman of Villanova University and won first place in the video category of the 2017 A-mu-sing contest. The lyrics parody the song "How Far I'll Go" from the Disney animated feature film Moana (sung by Alessia Cara for the movie soundtrack).
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  • A quote to stimulate a discussion about Bayesian estimation and the relationship between the degree of ignorance about a parameter and its probability distribution. The quote is by English novelist Mary Anne Evans (1819-1880) who wrote under the pen name George Eliot. The quote is from her 1876 novel Daniel Deronda.
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