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  • A poem to develop an understanding of permutations. A question like "Why is the word importunate used in a poem about a permutation?" will help the conversation. The poem was written by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso in 2017.
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  • A poem to illustrate the dependence between trials when sampling is without replacement. To set this poem up in the classroom, you might ask the students questions like: "If I want to put the Supreme Court Justices in a random order, I can pick one at a time without replacement. Before I pick the first Justice, do I know who it's going to be? Before I pick the last Justice, do I know who it's going to be?" The poem was written in 2017 by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • A video for use in teaching about the dangers of extrapolating well beyond the range of the data in linear regression. The lyrics and Powerpoint components of the video were written by Michael Posner while the vocals were done by Reena Freedman of Villanova University and won first place in the video category of the 2017 A-mu-sing contest. The lyrics parody the song "How Far I'll Go" from the Disney animated feature film Moana (sung by Alessia Cara for the movie soundtrack).
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  • A quote to stimulate a discussion about Bayesian estimation and the relationship between the degree of ignorance about a parameter and its probability distribution. The quote is by English novelist Mary Anne Evans (1819-1880) who wrote under the pen name George Eliot. The quote is from her 1876 novel Daniel Deronda.
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  • A quote that might be used in a discussion of why uncertainty is greatest when the probability of success is close to 50% (and also amenable to more study). The quote is by American author and Professor of Psychiatry Judith M Bardwick (1933 - ) from her book Danger in the Comfort Zone (1995). The quote may also be found at www.quotationsbywomen.com
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  • A cartoon suitable for use in discussing situations where the explanatory variable has essentially no predictive power (whether the variables have a statistically significant relationship or not). The cartoon is number 1725 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.
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  • A cartoon suitable for use in discussing the interpretation of p-values of different levels. The cartoon is number 1478 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.
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  • A cartoon suitable for use in discussing the validity of indexes constructed to be relevant for a concept. The cartoon is number 1571 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.
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  • A cartoon to be used in discussing summary statistics that juxtaposes various interesting statistics. The cartoon is #1743 in the web comic Piled Higher and Deeper by Panamanian cartoonist Jorge Cham (1976- ): see www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1743. Free for use in classrooms and course websites with acknowledgement (i.e. "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham, www.phdcomics.com)
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  • A cartoon to be used in discussing summary statistics (comparing means ± error bars). One aspect of part of the graph for discussion shows an error bar going below zero for a variable that should be positive. The cartoon is #1793 in the web comic Piled Higher and Deeper by Panamanian cartoonist Jorge Cham (1976- ): see www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1793. Free for use in classrooms and course websites with acknowledgement (i.e. "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham, www.phdcomics.com)
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